Available courses

Students are expected to learn and understand the sources of data in Nigeria. The student will be acquitted with hypothesis testing on both the parametric and non-parametric statistics. They will be engaged in learning on the usage of a large and small sample of the hypothesis testing in the population mean, correlation and regression analyses, t-test, ANOVA, and time series to know the significant differences between and among the tested variables.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

Mathematics is the soul of any business. Because a business primarily revolves around the transaction of money or products that have some monetary value. Involvement of money makes it extremely important to have sufficient knowledge about the basics of calculations. This is where business mathematics comes into play. It deals with the fundamental topics that one needs to carry out business related calculations. So, here we are going to learn about the mathematical tools needed for business calculations along with their applications.

Business Mathematics is the study of mathematics required by the students interested in a business field such as Accounting, Finance, Marketing, or Economics. Regardless of your path, you cannot avoid dealing with money and numbers. Both personally and in your career you certainly use elementary arithmetic such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. However, there is a whole field of mathematics that deals specifically with money. You will work with functions and equations, elements of costing and budgeting, rates, taxes, insurance, gross earnings, product prices, statistical distribution and density functions, matrices and vectors, calculus and currency exchange; you will be offered loans, lines of credit, mortgages, leases, savings bonds, and other financial tools. Do you know what these are and how these financial tools can maximize your earnings and minimize your costs? Do you have what it takes to execute smart monetary decisions both personally and for your business? Do you know how interest works and how it gets calculated? If you can answer “yes” to these questions, then you are already off to a great start. If not, by the end of this tutorial class, you will have a better understanding of all of these topics and more.

Course Contents

1.      Definition and Types of Equations and Functions

2.      Elements of Costing and Budgeting, rates, taxes and insurance

3.      Introduction to Statistical Distribution and Density functions especially the Binomial, Poisson and Normal

4.      Matrices and Vectors

5.      Introduction to Calculus functions of the variables and their continuity

6.      Techniques of Differentiation – Logarithmic, Trigonometric and Exponential functions

7.      Integral Calculus

8.      Optimization of functions, Maximal, Minimum and Inflexion points and the application of these concepts in business, finance and economics.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The role of theory in Accounting; Accounting Methodology and the need for consistence theory; Construction and Validation of Accounting Theory; Accounting theory and regulatory framework; The generally acceptable accounting principles (GAAP); An examination of legislative and quasi-legislative requirements for financial statement; Theories of Depreciation; The concept of the Deprival value in determination of depreciation; Theory of Income measurements – expenses and gains and their impact on financial reporting.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is a follow up of Financial Accounting I (ACC 201).  With good knowledge of the contents of ACC 201, students taking this course (ACC 202) will be further exposed to the following issues:

Goodwill: Meaning and different methods of calculation; Advance partnership accounts: Realization of assets and dissolution of partnership, piecemeal realization of assets.  Conversion of partnership to Limited Liability Company; Accounting for liabilities and shareholders’ equity. 

Miscellaneous accounts: 

Goods on sale or return; Hire purchase transactions; Pension and dividend funds; farmers account; Investment account; voyage account; Underwriting account.

CONTACT SCHEDULE: Monday, 2.00 4.00 p.m.

Week 1: Review of some important topics in Financial Accounting I.

Week 2: Goodwill: Meaning and different methods of calculation.

Week 3: Dissolution of partnership: one off realization of assets.

Week4: Dissolution of partnership: piecemeal realization of assets.

Week 5: Conversion of partnership to Limited Liability Company.

Week6: Accounting for liabilities and shareholders’ equity.

Week 7: Goods on sale or return; Hire purchase transactions.

Week 8: Pension and dividend funds; Investment account.

Week 9: Farmers account.

Week 10: Voyage account; Underwriting account.

Week 11: End of semester Assessment

Week 12: REVISION WEEK

Overall revision of the topics from weeks 1 to 11.

RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Yusuf, Babtunde R. (20..), Financial Accounting: Concepts and Practices, Lagos:

Ishola, K. I. (20..), Foundation of Accounting.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS

·         Attendance is compulsory for all students who register for the course.

·         A minimum of 70% attendance must be achieved to qualify to write the examination.

·         There will be a mid-semester evaluation as part of the continuous assessment.

·         Assignment must be submitted promptly.

·         An end of semester evaluation will be administered.

 

 

 

GRADING:                                                                                      

Topics discussion and exercises          10%

Evaluation (weekly)                            10%

Mid-Semester Evaluation                   10%

Attendance & Class Performance       10%

Final Examination                               60%

 

Total                                                 100%


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is a follow up course of Auditing and Investigation I (ACC 403).  In addition to ACC 403, students taking this course (ACC404) should have been conversant with financial accounting, company law, information technology, Accounting Theory among other relevant courses.  Students will also be exposed to the following issues:

 Audit guidelines and standards: scope of audit guidelines and standards, the auditors’ operational standards; audit reports and communication with management: definitions, matters to be expressly stated in audit report; reasons for preparing audit reports and types of audit reports.   Letter of representation, letter of engagement and domestic report; auditors liability: definition, negligence, liability to client and to third party; civil liability under CAMA 1990 and criminal liability; minimizing claims against the auditor; audit working papers: definitions, types and contents; reasons for and ownership of working papers; verification of assets; review of financial statement; cut-off procedures and going concern problem; audit of computerized accounting system: computer system and data processing, special features of computer processing affecting audit, audit approaches of a computerized accounting system; computer-assisted audit techniques (CAATS); internal control in a computerized system; investigations; audit of specialized companies e.g. banks and insurance companies; tax audit.

CONTACT SCHEDULE: Yet to be scheduled.

 Week 1: Audit guidelines and standards: scope and the auditors’ operational standards.

Week 2: Audit reports and communication with management: definitions, matters to be expressly stated in audit report; reasons for preparing audit reports and types of audit reports.

Week 3: Letter of representation, letter of engagement and domestic report.

Week4: Auditor’s liability: definition, negligence, liability to client and to third party; civil liability under CAMA 1990 and criminal liability; minimizing claims against the auditor.

Week 5: Audit working papers: definitions, types and contents; reasons for and ownership of working papers.

Week6: i. Verification of assets.

              ii. Review of financial statement; cut-off procedures and going concern problem.

 Week 7: Audit of computerized accounting system: computer system and data processing, special features of computer processing affecting audit.

Week 8: Audit approaches of a computerized accounting system; computer-assisted audit techniques (CAATS)

Week 9: Internal control in a computerized system.

Week 10: i. Investigations;

                ii. Audit of specialized companies e.g. banks and insurance companies; tax audit.

Week 11: End of semester Assessment

Week 12: REVISION WEEK

Overall revision of the topics from weeks 1 to 11.

RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Olowookere, K. (2014), Fundamentals of Auditing & Other Assurance Services, Revised Ed., Ibadan: Aseda Publishing.

 Adeniji, A. A. (2010), Auditing & Assurance Services, Lagos: Value Analysis Consult.

  

REQUIREMENTS

·         Attendance is compulsory for all students who register for the course.

·         A minimum of 70% attendance must be achieved to qualify to write the examination.

·         There will be a mid-semester evaluation as part of the continuous assessment.

·         Assignment must be submitted promptly.

·         An end of semester evaluation will be administered.

 

 GRADING:                                                                                  Paper Presentation                              05%

Paper Discussion                                 05%

Evaluation (weekly)                            10%

Mid-Semester Evaluation                   10%

Attendance & Class Performance       10%

Final Examination                               60%

 Total                                                 100%

 


Management Accounting is a branch of accounting that is concerned with the identification,  measurement,  analysis and interpretation of Accounting information so that it can be used to help managers to make necessary decisions to efficiently manage a company's operations (CFI, 2020). The students are to expose to the following areas for the course are;  capital budgeting; standard costing and variance; cost control and cost reduction; marketing strategies  and pricing policies; pricing methods and application of marginal costing in pricing decision; learning curve theory; linear programming techniques; transfer pricing techniques; performance evaluation in divisionalized structure; 

This is a prerequisite course for intermediate financial accounting I. It exposes the student to the following areas; Interpretation of Financial Statement (Intra and inter analysis), understanding of IFRS (various standard, implementation of the standard, effect of various standard on financial reporting), Takeover and business valuation, amalgamation and absorption, reorganization and reconstruction of companies, bankruptcy and liquidation and also, accounting for inflation


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This centres on the use of computer in accounting, types of computer, software and application of management information systems in accounting. This course exposes students to different accounting packages such as Peachtree and SAGE, how to write small application and the use of off-the-shelf software relating to accounting.

CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

The  course  content  consists  of  basic  accounting  practice  and  finance  that  relates  to  public service. The aim of the course is to educate student on how public sector accounting and finance is treated following basic accounting concepts and relevant laws and procedures.

At the end of study, among other objectives, student should be able to:  understand the nature of the public sector; understand the difference between public sector organizations and government business organizations; know the Legal and regulatory framework of public sector accounting and finance in Nigeria; Accounting concepts, principles and bases; Fund Accounting; Sources of Government Revenue; Government Expenditure; Financial Control in Government; and Accounting for Local Governments

Strategic Financial Management supports management in making informed decisions. Student are expected to apply relevant knowledge in recommending appropriate options for financing a business, recognizing and managing financial risks and investments. The course critically examines Capital Budgeting under Risk and Uncertainty, Capital Rationing, Capital Budgeting under Taxation and Inflation, Management of Working Capital, Interpretation of Financial Statements and Financial Analysis, Business Mergers and Takeovers, Determinants and Implications of Dividend Policy, Valuation of Shares, Assets and Enterprises, and Methods of avoiding Financial Risks


The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) defines marginal cost as “the 

variable cost of one unit of a product or service” and marginal costing as a “principle whereby 

marginal cost units are ascertained”. The student are to be expose to the following areas for the 

course are; marginal and absorption costing, breakeven analysis, process costing, inventory 

valuation, budget and budgeting system, standard costing and variance analysis and cost and cost 

reduction.

Research Methodology exposes students to the concepts and theories of research as a field of 

inquiry, and then equips students with skills necessary for conducting a research. It enables 

students to understand the methods of seeking knowledge in general, and knowledge generated 

through scientific research in particular. The course critically examines meaning and types of 

scientific research, basic research concept (theory, law, hypothesis, and research design), 

choosing a researchable topic (problem analysis, literature review, model building and 

conceptual framework), research proposal, sampling techniques, data collection techniques, 

types and strategies of data collection, data analysis and interpretation.

This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical framework, principles, and practice of international accounting. Students will be exposed to accounting issues unique to multinational corporations, especially with respect to foreign operations, and also acquire basic knowledge about the various functional areas of accounting in many countries of the world. In the course, students will learn the different features of the world’s major accounting systems, corporate governance and tax systems and develop the skills to use accounting information from foreign sources to make various economic decisions.


The Classical Theory of Company taxation. Chargeable incomes, Exemptions from company taxation, Deductible and Non-deductible expenses; Ascertainment of Assessable Profit: Basis of Assessment, Basis Period – Normal and Abnormal; Preceding and Actual Year basis periods. Mode of assessment for New and Old businesses, Cessation and Charge in accounting date. The tax payer’s right of election; Ascertainment of Total Profit: Treatment of Losses and Capital allowances; Adjusted profit of companies; Education Tax Capital Gain Tax; Value-Added Tax; Pioneer Legislation; Taxation of specialized companies such as banks, insurance companies and foreign air and shipping companies and Petroleum Profit Tax.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

Review of Basic Accounting Concepts and Principles; Accounting for Fixed and Current Assets;

Depreciation of fixed Assets and various methods of providing for depreciation; Accounting of a

sole trader including end-of-year adjustment; Mathematics for Accounting: Discounts (Trade,

Quantity and Cash); Manufacturing Accounts; Mark up and Margin. Correction of Errors and

uses of Suspense Account; Bank Reconciliation Statements; Accounts of Non-profit making

organizations; and Goods on sale or return.

The Islamic portfolio management requires a unique form of financial and non-financial risks that have distinctive elements ad strategies to cope with the ever changing business environment among Islamic financial institutions related to today’s business dynamics. Considering the aim of this course, theories on Islamic portfolio management related to their bank financial services are review and establish in order to establish whether Islamic banking institution relate with modern measures of risks and attend to bank customers in the Islamic financial services and institution industry. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able understand the important and various risks measure related to Islamic portfolio management.

The course comprises of units distributed into ten weeks (10) that together cover the study blocks. The course provides a conceptual overview of Islamic portfolio management. This can be broken down into the following weekly topics: Week 1-2: Concept of Islamic financial institution and risks associated with/exposed to Islamic financial institutions; Week 3-4: Measuring and mitigating risks within Islamic banking system or institutions; Week 5: Treasury product development and management; Week 6: Islamic operations and risk management; Week 7-8: Assessment of market risks exposures, development and application of risk control; Week 9-10:   Mitigating risks in conventional and Islamic banking practices.

 


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION                  

This course is built on BFN 325. It discusses capital structure – how taxes affect financing choices,

dividends, share repurchases, e.t.c. It also covers capital structure and corporate strategy, incentives,

asymmetric information and corporate control, risk management and corporate strategy.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION           

This course centres on the use of computer in banking and finance, types of computer, software and application of management information systems in banking and finance. This course exposes students to different accounting and banking packages, how to write small application and the use of off-the-shelf software relating to banking.

The course aims to groom the student in the area of financial economics, how to build functional and econometric models with interpretation of regression output which prepares student for life journey in the field of financial econometrics through analysis of financial econometrics. Sooner or later, the student, after his studies, will be able to know applied and pure econometrics. Also, knowledge of financial econometrics and understanding of financial econometrics will be useful to the student in other areas of human endeavor.

The course was distributed into ten weeks (10) that together cover the study blocks. The course provides a conceptual overview of financial economics. This can be broken down into the following weekly topics: Week 1-2: Financial economics and econometrics, econometric principles as well as aim of financial economics; Week 3-4: Financial model, functional model, econometrics model, financial data, time series data, cross-section data, panel data, dummy data with examples; Week 5-6: Econometric techniques related to finance-linear regression, Generalized linear models, probit regression, logit regression, tobit regression, ARIMA, vector autoregression, co-integration, and correlation; Week 7: Inference regression methods for CAPM and Arbitrage Pricing Model; Week 8: Market efficiency and concept of volatility as well as loss, risk and Value-at-Risk; Week 9: Modeling volatility; Week 10: Modeling long-run relationships in finance.


Monetary policy is a deliberate action of the monetary authorities to influence the quantity, cost and availability of money credit in order to achieve desired macroeconomic objectives of internal and external balances. The action is carried out through changing money supply and/or interest rates with the aim of managing the quantity of money in the economy. Thus, monetary policy as a technique of economic management to bring about sustainable economic growth and development has been the pursuit of nations and formal articulation of how money affects economic aggregates. Considering the objective of this course, key concepts are focused to provide an appreciation of the monetary theories that established the important of monetary policies in relations to economic policy and reforms. This course is designed to emphasize both theoretical and analytical aspects of monetary policy and theory as well as deals with modern monetary theoretical concepts and instruments.

The course comprises of units distributed into ten weeks (10) that together cover the study blocks. The course provides a conceptual overview of monetary theory and policy. This can be broken down into the following weekly topics: Week 1: Money (Its definition, value, roles and importance) and Demand for Money; Week 2-3: Theories of money – Fisher’s version, Income velocity approach and Cambridge Approach; Week 4-5: Liquidity Preference theory and Keynesian Approach to theory of money; Week 6-7: Supply of Money (Money multiplier and approach and Portfolio approach); Week 8-9: Inflation – (Definition, types, causes, effects and control, Theories of  inflation); Week 10: Monetary Policy – (Definition, Objectives, Types, Instruments).


The course aims to groom the student to understand principles and types of money, functions of money, banking and Nigeria financial system which prepares him for life journey in the field of banking and finance through understanding of general functions of money and banking institutions. Sooner or later, the student, after his studies, will be involved in banking and financial market transaction of one kind or another and the making financial decision or another to make protected financial investment and gains to sustain himself and his family. Also, knowledge of banking activities will be useful to the student in other areas of human endeavor and financial instruments investment.

The course comprises of units distributed into ten weeks (10) that together cover the study blocks. The course provides a conceptual overview of money and banking II. This can be broken down into the following weekly topics: Week 1-2: Financial system, Nigerian financial system, Nature of financial system, Structure of financial system; Week 3: Efficient financial system and economic development, role of the financial system to economic development and contributions of the financial system to economic development; Week 4: Nature of Financial Markets, Classifications of Financial Markets, Development of Financial Markets in Nigeria and informal financial markets; Week 5: The money market concept, Evolution and growth of the Nigerian money market and Motives or objectives of the Nigerian money market; Week 6: Nature of the capital market, Evolution of the Nigerian capital market, Structure of the Nigerian capital market, Operational modes of the Nigerian capital market, Objectives and functions of the Nigerian Capital Market, challenges and prospects of the Nigerian capital market; Week 7: Federal Ministry of Finance, Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), Bankers Committee, Nigerian Deposit Insurance Corporation (NDIC), National Insurance Commission, Nigerian Pension Commission, Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Nigerian Stock Exchange and Abuja Securities and Commodities Exchange; Week 8: Financial Institutions: Financial institution, rationale for the emergence of the banking institution, Brief origin of the banking institutions, Distinction between a bank and a banker, Distinction between a bank and a money lender, informal financial institutions and roles of banking institution in economic development; Week 9: Bank categorization-Central Bank from global perspective, Functions of the Central Bank and the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), Commercial Banking, Forms of Commercial Banks, Functions of Commercial Banks, Commercial Banks and Economic Development, pension institutions and administration and development/specialized banking institutions; Week 10: International financial institutions and inflation rate

 



The marketing of financial services requires a unique form of marketing that has distinctive elements, explore the strategies and tactics needed to cope with the ever changing business environment in financial markets related to today’s business dynamics. Considering the aim of this course, marketing theories related to bank financial services are review and establish the link between theoretical and bank financial service practices in order to establish whether modern bank customers and marketing of financial services are in the same trend. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able understand the important of marketing in commercial bank service delivery to customers.

The course comprises of units distributed into ten weeks (10) that together cover the study blocks. The course provides a conceptual overview of Marketing of Financial Services. This can be broken down into the following weekly topics: Week 1-2: Concepts of Marketing and Financial Services, Marketing Review and the Role of Marketing in the Service Industry; Week 3-4: Consumer Behaviour and Decision Process: Segmentation, Targeting, Positioning, Service and Customer Orientation and Financial Services Development; Week 5-6: Marketing Channels and the Effects of Technology, Pricing, Profitability, Decision Making Communication (DMC): Advertising, Branding, Sales Promotion, Sponsorships. Week 7-8: Events in the Financial Services Industry, Building, Marketing Staff Retention and Loyalty; Week 9-10: Competitive Strategies in the Financial Services industry, Globalisation, External Environmental Factors and their impact on the Financial Services Industry.


 


 

FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY, OSOGBO

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE

Academic Year: 2018/2019               Second Semester

Course Title: Management of Financial Institution.    Course code: BFN 318

Number of Unit:  3

Lecturer-in-Charge:      Mr..ADEBAYO, Lateef Abimbola.

                                   (M.Sc ,  B.Sc,L LB, Lagos, B.L, FCIB, ACIS)

E-mail. bayobimbola@gmail.com: Telephone . 08052984132, 08161646528

The course exposes students to the roles of Financial Institutions in an economy as relate to developing country, its current state and decision making levels. It will also enable students to  understand the dimension and diversity of management problem and multidisciplinary nature of the decision process in banks and financial institutions. It will assist students in developing competency in the application of knowledge  of theory to real life decision making situations.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

MANAGEMENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS.  BFN318

COURSE OUT LINE.

WEEK 1 &2.

1  THE ROLES OF FINANCE IIN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF COUNTRY.

        Introduction and definition of Financial Institutions.

        The relevance or otherwise of Finance to economic development.

        Appraisal of the roles..

WEEK 3 & 4

2. REGULATORY ENVIROMENT

        Overview of the regulatory environment.

        Regulation institutions and functions.

        Supervisory Institutions and functions.

        Institutional environment and roles relationship.

WEEK 5

3. VARIOUS FINANCIAL VEHICLES AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES

        Setting objective.

        Defining policy , strategy and tactics.

        Constraints to corporate planning and gaps.

        Internal and external constraints

WEEK 6 & 7

4.  BANK DISTRESS MANAGEMENT.

        Definition of distress.

        Causes of distress.

        Control of distress (Preventive and corrective measure)

        The role of Asset Management Corporation and Nigeria Deposit Insurance Corporation.

WEEK 8 & 9

5. THE ROLE OF DIRECTORS AND THEIR RESPONSIBILITIES

·         Definition and classification of Directors.

·         Statutory roles and supervisory/informal roles.

·         Responsibilities and liabilities

·         Audit Committee’s roles.

·         Corporate Governance issue.

·         Insider related activities and reporting.

WEEK 10

6. RISK MANAGEMENT

·         Risk identification and various type of risks.

·         Risk measurement .

·         Risk management.

·         Portfolio  management.

WEEK 11 & 12

7. LIQUIDITY MANAGMENT

        Definition /Types of liquidity.

        Liquidity measurement.

        Role of liquidity.

        Liquidity planning.

        Liquidity Control

WEEK 12

8. FRAUD.

        Definition of fraud and forgeries.

        Types of fraud.

        Causes of fraud.

        Control of fraud

 

WEEK 14: REVISION AND TEST

GRADING SYSTEM;

ASSIGNMENT = 15%

TEST = 15%

ATTENDANCE= 5%

BONUS MARK= 5%

EXAMINATION = 60%

TOTAL MARKS = 100%.

 

 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS

1.      Nwankwo G. O. (1991). Bank Management: Principles and Practice. Lagos : Malthons Press Limited.

2.      Ituwe C.  E (2010) Management of Financial Institutions. Lagos: Kenadeb Publisher.

3.      Kally M.V.(1993) Financial Institutions in South Africa; Financial investment & Risk Management.

4.      Crosse, Haward D and Hampel, George H (1973). Management Policies for Commercial Banks Engliwood Cliffs N.J. Prentice Hall .Incor.

CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course provides an overview of the capital market as a financial market in which long-term debt (over a year) or equity-backed securities are bought and sold. Capital markets channel the wealth of savers to those who can put it to long-term productive use, such as companies or governments making long-term investments. The capital market is a sub-set of the financial system that serves as engine of growth in modern economies. It is that section of the financial system that is involved in providing long-term funds for productive use. The capital market therefore provides an option for governments and companies to raise investment capital for the construction of waterworks, bridges, schools and factories and purchase of vehicles, facilities and equipment using such financial instruments such as equities and bonds. The capital market can also be used as a vehicle to acquire other companies.

Capital Market can also be defined as the network of institutions and individuals made up of regulators, and operators who, together, facilitate the smooth operation of the market. In this regard, the capital market constituencies can be broadly divided into four categories, namely:

Provider of funds (investors – individuals, Unit Trusts/mutual funds, pension funds and other institutional investors)

Users of funds (companies and governments and their agencies).

Intermediaries (facilitators – stock broking houses, issuing houses, registrars, etc).

Regulators (Government Regulatory Agencies, such as SEC, and the Central Bank and self Regulatory Organization such as The Nigerian Stock Exchange)


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

The importance research design and methodology has been recognized by the global business environment. It is becoming obvious that without research, planning and forecasts will be difficult to get by. This course will be an eye opener to business planners and researchers alike. There is a strong belief that research has not been put in its proper place, because the knowledge of research is scanty among students a business researcher especially in the developing world of today. The course will also present some issues of critical importance in the writing of research proposals. The ethics in the research process has also been a serious issue in the research profession. To this end, the course highlights how ethical research can be put in place and how it can benefit all stake holders. The course highlights the problems of research in developing countries and suggests ways in which the problems can be approached.

The Course Objectives

This course is aimed at acquainting students with the practical aspects of research in Finance and social sciences. Its major focus is on the globally acceptable research process, including choice of research topic, choice of research design, data collection, data analysis, and statistical inferences. To ensure that this aim is achieved, such issues as research proposals, types of research designs, data presentation techniques, and related areas will be presented in detail.

On completion of the requirements of this course students and managers alike will be able to:

Define and understand the research process

Choose a researchable project topic

Write a good research proposal

Understand the different types of research designs

Understand the meaning and types of sampling designs

Determine the sample size for a given survey activity

Write research questions and construct the corresponding questionnaires

Know the characteristics of a good questionnaire, and administer such questionnaire

Effectively present data, analyze them, and prepare the research report.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

The course BFN 408: Corporate Finance II is a Second Semester course work of three credit units. It is available to all students taking Finance Programmes in the College of Management and Social Sciences. The course consists of twenty units including, overview of corporate finance, understanding financial statement, investment and financing decisions, dividend decision, corporate strategy and firm value. The idea is to enable students apply complex theory to real firms, to help them understands that implications and that any decision that involves the use of money is a corporate financial decision.

The course guide tells you what the course BFN 408 is all about, the materials you will be using and how to make use of the materials to ensure adequate success. Other information that are contained in the course includes how to make use of your time and information on tutor marked assignment and questions.

What you will learn in this course

In this course you will learn about the decisions made by firms which have financial implications. It consists of twenty one (21) units and discusses in details of corporate financial analysis – the tools and techniques that are used on a day to day basis, how these tools and techniques are fitted together and the common principles that apply across all of them.

Course Aims

In today’s business environment where there is a corporate financial aspect to almost every action taken by a firm, the students of Finance degree programme will be given good grounding of Corporate Finance so that they will be able to cope with manipulation of investment, financing and dividend decisions.

READING TEXT

Ross, et al (2006), Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, USA: McGraw – Hill, Inc.

Damodaran A. (1997), Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice, USA: John Wiley & Sons Inc.

The course examines the basic rudiment of lending and importance of loan to business organizations. Various funding options available and their suitability for different type of business organizations. The method of evaluation of different type of funding, appropriate collateral for each type funding will be taught. Sources of revenue for the government and method of repayment of government loans. The basic Cs of lending as one of the tools for credit evaluation including ratio analysis etc. will be discussed extensively. 

 


The course exposes students to the basic understanding of the various functions which  banks also perform apart from their traditional functions such as acceptance of deposits and giving out loan to customers. It also teaches students various environmental challenges that inhibit smooth performance of business organizations. The whole essence of the course is to equip students on how to survive on their own using the various financial instruments without necessarily relying on paid employment.


The objective of the course is to equip the students with the basic types of securities available for bank lending as well as method of creating the mortgages. The course exposes students to the basic knowledge of property in law, its characteristics and how it relates to banking operations. Difference between Legal and Equitable Mortgage and process of creating different types of Mortgages will be imparted in the students. Various types of securities such as Land, Life Insurance Policy, Shares and other tangible securities together with their advantages and disadvantages will be extensively discussed. Other intangible securities such as guarantee, indemnities Letter of comfort as well as their applicability under different situation will be taught. 


The course introduces students to the basic understanding of the various laws necessary to guide the operations of business organizations so that the would-be business executives can have good knowledge of what it takes to have smooth operations in the various aspect of businesses as a going concern.  Students will have opportunities to acquire knowledge on definition of laws, sources of Nigeria laws, Law of Contract, elementary aspect of law of Torts, the law of Negotiable Instrument and Sales of goods will also be tought.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

Investment analysis and portfolio management course objective is to help entrepreneurs and practitioners to understand the investments field as it is currently understood and practiced for sound investment decisions making. Following this objective, key concepts are presented to provide an appreciation of the theory and practice of investments, focusing on investment portfolio formation and management issues. This course is designed to emphasize both theoretical and analytical aspects of investment decisions and deals with modern investment theoretical concepts and instruments.

The course comprises of five (7) units distributed into ten weeks (10) that together cover the study blocks. The course provides a conceptual overview of Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management. This can be broken down into the following weekly topics: Week 1-2: QUANTITATIVE METHODS OF INVESTMENT ANALYSIS; Week 3-4: THEORY OF INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO FORMATION; Week 5: INVESTMENT IN STOCKS; Week 6: INVESTMENT IN BONDS; Week 7: PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS IN INVESTMENT DECISION MAKING;; Week 8: USING OPTIONS AS INVESTMENTS; Week 9-10: PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT AND EVALUATION.

Upon completion of this course, Students are expected to practice all the underlisted study questions between weeks 1-10:

Study Questions 1

1. Comment why methods and tools of the statistics are so important in investment decision making.

2. Distinguish between historical returns and expected returns.

3. Define the components of holding period return. Can any of these components be negative?

4. When should the sample mean of return be used instead of expected rate of return?

5. What does a probability distribution describe?

6. What does covariance measure? If two assets are said to have positive covariance, what does it mean?

7. Explain, why doesn’t an estimated absolute covariance number tell the investor much about the relationship between the returns on the two assets?

8. How do you understand an investment risk and what statistic tools can be used to measure it?

Study Questions 2

1. Explain why most investors prefer to hold a diversified portfolio of securities as opposed to placing all of their wealth in a single asset.

2. In terms of the Markowitz portfolio model, explain, how an investor identify his/her optimal portfolio. What specific information does an investor need to identify optimal portfolio?

3. How many portfolios are on an efficient frontier? How is an investor’s risk aversion indicated in an indiference curve?

4. Describe the key assumptions underlying CAPM.

5. Many of underlyong assumptions of the CAPM are violated in some degree in “real world”. Does that fact invalidate model’s calculations? Explain.

6. If the risk-free rate of return is 6% and the return on the market portfolio is 10%, what is the expected return on an asset having a Beta of 1,4, according to the CAPM?

7. How does the CAPM differs from the APT model?

8. What is meant by an efficient market? What are the benefits to the economy from an efficient market?

9. What are the conditions for an efficient market? Discuss if are they met in the reality.

Study Questions 3

1. The investor wants to identify if the stock of firm A is cyclical. How he/ she would proceed?

2. Common stock hasn‘t term to maturity. How then can a stock that does not pay dividends have any value? Give an examples of such firms listed in the domestic market of your country.

3. What is the difference between blue chip and income stocks?

4. Present the examples of blue chip stocks in the domestic market Explain, why did you categorize them as blue chips.

5. What is meant by the intrinsic (investment) value of a stock?

Study Questions 4

1. How the zero coupon bond provide returns to investors?

2. Is any mortgage bond or asset backed security necessarily a more secure investment than any debenture? Comment.

3. What features of the Eurobond market make Eurobonds attractive both for issuers and investors?

4. What is the purpose of bond ratings? If the bonds ratings are so important to the investors why don‘t common stock investors focus on quality ratings of the companies in making their investment decisions?

5. How would you expect interest rates to respond to the following economic events (what would be the direction of the interest rates changes)? Explain why.

a) Increase in investments;

b) Increase in savings level;

c) Decrease in export;

d) Decrease in import;

e) Increase in government spending;

f) Increase in Taxes.

6. Distinguish between yield-to-call and yield-to-maturity.

7. What is the difference between the market expectation theory and the liquidity preference theory?

Study Questions 5

1. Why the portfolios of overconfident investors have a higher risk? Give the reasons.

2. Give the characteristic of the overconfident investor.

3. Why do the investors tend to sell losing stocks together, on the same trading session, and separate the sale of winning stocks over several trading sessions?

4. Explain how mental accounting is related with the disposition effect.

5. How do you understand the disposition effect?

6. Give the examples how „snakebite effect“ influence the investors behavior.

7. The behavior of the people when they demand much more to sell thing than they would be willing to pay to buy it is understood as

a) „Snakebite“ effect

b) „House-money“ effect

c) Endowment effect

d) Disposition effect

e) „Sunk-cost“effect.

Study Questions 6

1. Distinguish between a put and a call.

2. What does it mean to say „an option buyer has a right but not an obligation?

3. Explain the following terms used with the options:

a) „In the money“

b) „Out of money“

c) „At the money“

4. What is the difference between option premium and option price?

5. What is the relationship between option prices and their intrinsic value?

Study Questions 7

1. Give the arguments for active portfolio management.

2. What are the reasons which cause investors managing their portfolios passively to make changes their portfolios?

3. What are the major differences between active and passive portfolio management?

4. Explain the role of revision in the process of managing a portfolio.

5. Distinguish strategic and tactical asset allocation.

6. What role does current market information play in managing investment portfolio?

7. Why is the asset allocation decision the most important decision made by investors?

8. What is the point of investment portfolio rebalancing?

9. What changes in investor’s circumstances cause the rebalancing of the investment portfolio? Explain why.

10. Why is portfolio revision not free of cost?

11. Why benchmark portfolios are important in investment portfolio management?

12. Briefly describe each of the portfolio performance measures and explain how they are used:

a) Sharpe’s ratio;

b) Treynor’s ratio;

c) Jensen’s Alpha.


This course provides an overview of the global financial system in which financial institutions and their customers operate.  The purpose of the course material is to apply general finance concepts specifically to the management of financial institutions.  This course will examine the evolving structure and role of financial markets and financial institutions in providing financial intermediary services to the economy in the dynamic Information Age. 

The course comprises of five (5) units distributed into ten weeks (10) that together cover the study blocks. The course provides a conceptual overview of Comparative financial markets and financial institutions. This can be broken down into the following weekly topics: Week I-2: INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW OF FINANCIAL MARKETS; Week 3-4: SECURITIES MARKETS; Week 5- 6: DEPOSIT MONEY BANKS; Week 7- 8: OTHER FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS and Week 9- 10: RISK MANAGEMENT IN FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS. 

Upon completion of this course, Students are expected to practice all the underlisted study questions between weeks 1-10:

Study Questions 1

1)      Differentiate between primary and secondary markets.

2)      Differentiate between money and capital markets.

3)      What do you understand by the term foreign exchange markets?

4)      Define the term derivative security markets

5)      Distinguish between the different types of financial institutions.

6)      Enumerate and discuss the services financial institutions perform.

7)      Enumerate and discuss the risks financial institutions face.

8)      Why are financial institutions regulated?

9)      Why are financial markets becoming increasingly global?

 Study Questions 2

1)      Distinguish between a mortgage and a mortgage - backed security.

2)      Describe the main types of mortgages issued by financial institutions.

3)      Identify the major characteristics of a mortgage.

4)      Examine how a mortgage amortization schedule is determined.

5)      Describe some of the new innovations in mortgage financing.

6)      Define a mortgage sale.

7)      Define a pass - through security .

8)      Define a collateralized mortgage obligation.

9)      Understand what foreign exchange markets and foreign exchange rates are.

10)  Know what the euro is and how/why it was created.

11)  Distinguish between a spot foreign exchange transaction and a forward foreign exchange transaction.

12)  Calculate return and risk on foreign exchange transactions.

13)  Describe the role of financial institutions in foreign exchange transactions.

14)  Identify the relations among interest rates, inflation, and exchange rates.

15)  Distinguish between forward and future contracts.

16)  Understand how a futures transaction is conducted.

17)  Identify information that can be found in a futures quote.

18)  Recognize what option contracts are.

19)  Examine information found in an options quote.

20)  Know the main regulators of futures and options markets.

21)  Describe an interest rate swap.

22)  Understand caps, floors, and collars.

Study Questions 3

1)      What is meant by the term depository institution? How does a depository institution differ from an industrial corporation?

2)      What are the major sources of funds for commercial banks in Nigeria? What are the major uses of funds for commercial banks in Nigeria? For each of your answers, specify where the item appears on the balance sheet of a typical commercial bank.

3)      What are the principal types of financial assets for commercial banks? How has the relative importance of these assets changed over the past five decades? What are some of the forces that have caused these changes? What are the primary types of risk associated with these types of assets?

4)      Why do commercial banks hold investment securities?

5)      What are the principal liabilities for commercial banks?

6)      What does this liability structure tell us about the maturity of the liabilities of banks? What types of risks does this liability structure entail for commercial banks?

7)      What type of transaction accounts do commercial banks issue? Which type of accounts have dominated transaction accounts of banks?

8)      What are the three major segments of deposit funding? How are these segments changing over time? Why? What strategic impact do these changes have on the profitable operation of a bank?

9)      How does the liability maturity structure of a bank’s balance sheet compare with the maturity structure of the asset portfolio? What risks are created or intensified by these differences?

Study Questions 4

1)      Recognize the differences between a savings institution, a credit union, and a finance company.

2)      Identify the main assets and liabilities held by savings institutions.

3)      Know who regulates savings institutions.

4)      Discuss how savings institutions performed in the 2000s.

5)      Describe how credit unions are different from other depository institutions.

6)      Identify the main assets and liabilities held by credit unions.

7)      Define the major types of finance companies.

8)      Identify the major assets and liabilities held by finance companies.

9)      Examine the extent to which finance companies are regulated.

Study Questions 5

1)      Enumerate various types of financial risks

2)      Define the term ‘Market risks’

3)      What do you understand by the term ‘Liquidity risks?

4)      Define the term ‘Operational risks.

5)      How do you manage Financial risks?

6)      What are the key benefits of managing financial risks in an organization?





Marketing Management is the organizational discipline which focuses on the practical application of marketing orientation, techniques and methods inside enterprises and organizations and on the management of a firm’s marketing resources and activities. Marketing management often finds it necessary to invest in research to collect the data required to perform accurate marketing analysis. The  course will cover the following:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                                                           WEEK ONE

1.0     Marketing Management ………………………………………..

1.1     Fundamental Principles of Management ……………………...

1.2     Marketing Function …………………………………………….

1.3     Marketing Strategy ……………………………………………..

1.4     Marketing Management Versus Marketing Strategy………….

1.5     Strategic Marketing Planning ……………………………………

1.6     Strategic Planning Tools and Techniques ……………………….

WEEK TWO

2.0     Analytical Techniques in Marketing ……………………………

2.1     PEST Analysis ……………………………………………………

2.2     SWOT Analysis …………………………………………………..

2.3     Marketing Mix Model (4P’s) ……………………………………

2.4     Trend Analysis …………………………………………………..

WEEK THREE

3.0    Organization Marketing Plans ………………………………

3.1     Market Organization…………………………………………

3.2     Market Planning ……………………………………………...

3.3     Market Control …………………………………………………

3.4     Market Coordination …………………………………………

WEEK FOUR

4.0     Interactions of Marketing Functions ……………………….

4.1     Product ……………………………………………………….

4.2     Physical Distribution ………………………………………..

4.3     Promotion ……………………………………………………

4.4     Marketing Responsibility Behaviour ………………………

4.5     Social Responsibility Behaviour …………………………….


To achieve the aims of this course, there are overall objectives which the course is out to accomplish the listed course outlines, Students are expected to have a better understanding of the course contents listed below. 

1. Introduction  

2. Trade, growth, and sustainable development 

3. Tariffs and trade liberalization 

4. The system of international trade 

5. Globalization of the World Economy

6. The balance of payments.

7. Foreign trade protection.

8. Financial institutions 

9. Foreign Direct Investment

10. International trade law

Corporate planning is the act of creating a long-term plan to improve your business. A corporate plan examines a business’s internal capabilities and lays out strategies for how to use those capabilities to improve the company and meet goals. Think of a corporate plan as a roadmap laying out everything you need to do to achieve your future goals and reach new levels of success. The plan looks at each sector of a business and makes sure that all parts are aligned. Working towards similar goals corporate planning is often looked at through SWOT analysis. Further, it usually starts with broad goals and works its way towards a much more detailed analysis, laying out exactly how objectives will be reached.

                                           

TABLE OF CONTENTS

WEEK ONE

Corporate Planning and Strategy

1.1   Concept and Theory of Planning

1.2   Advantages of Planning

1.3   Corporate Planning

1.4   Advantages of Corporate Planning             

1.5   Process of Corporate Planning

1.6   Strategic Planning

1.7   Managing Planning Process

1.8   Steps for Managing Process

1.9   Environmental Study Analysis

WEEK TWO

Forecasting

1.1   Advantages of Forecasting

1.2   Types of Forecasting

CHAPTER THREE

Industrial Analysis

1.1   Advantages of Industrial Analysis

1.2   Planning Task

1.3   Planning Techniques

1.4   Operational Planning

1.5   Elements of Operational Planning

1.6   Organisation Planning

1.7   Types of Organisation Planning

1.8   Resource Allocation Process

1.9   Basis for Allocation

 


The main objective of this course is to familiarise students to research methods BUS 306 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY. The course is a prerequisite to long essay/ thesis in their final year. The knowledge from this course will assist the students to know how to design a researchable topic and carry out good research with meaningful results. The course is subdivided into ten modules from week one to week ten.

CONTENTS

1.     Introduction and Meaning of Research

2.     Nature, Characteristics and Types of Research

3.     Research Design

4.     Research Problem

5.     Population, Sample and Sampling Techniques

6.     Scaling Method

7.     Data Collection Process

8.     Data Analysis

9.     SPSS package

10.  E view data analysis for secondary data.

11.  Revision


Globalisation, technology advancement, open market system and desire of human beings to excel in the field one works has increased competitiveness and resultant work stress. Management of human behaviour and channelizing it into correct direction has become important. Application of motivational theories, the art of leadership and skill of redesigning jobs and modification to organisational structure is an ongoing process that facilitates positive work environment leading to increased job satisfaction of employees, greater productivity and organizational growth. The study of Organizational Behaviour (OB) is very interesting as it is related to individuals, group of people working together in teams. The study becomes more challenging when situational factors interact. The study of organizational behaviour relates to the expected behaviour of an individual in the organization. No two individuals are likely to behave in the same manner in a particular work situation. It is the predictability of a manager about the expected behaviour of an individual.


Industrial relations constitute one of the most complex problems of the modern industrial society that is characterized by swift change, industrial unrest and conflicting ideologies in the national and international spheres. It is a dynamic concept that depends upon the pattern of the society, economic system and political set-up of a country and changes with the changing economic and social order. It is an art of living together for production, productive efficiency, human well-being and industrial progress. It comprises of a network of institutions, such as, trade unionism, collective bargaining, employers, the law, and the state, which are bound together by a set of common values and aspirations. Knowledge of such institutions is important if we are to understand everyday industrial relations phenomena. These institutions are a social network of organisations, participants, processes and decisions: all of which interact and inter-relate together within the industrial relations environment and even beyond it.


Comparative management and administration are the studies that focus on differences in management and organization practice in different cultural settings or between industries, sectors of economics and the countries across the globe.  The course contains core concepts in comparative management, such as understanding the difference between universalistic and particularistic theories, evaluating the use and the usefulness of contingency theory, assessing the explanatory role of culture, the comparative approach to management and administration, models of comparative management and administration, human resources management practices by organizations in different cultural settings.


The aim of this course is to acquaint you with the behaviour and processes that consumers (individuals or groups) display in searching for, purchasing, using and evaluating and disposing of products and services that they expect will satisfy their needs. The course will also expose you on how individuals make decisions to spend their available resources (time, money, effort) on consumption-related items. That includes what they buy, why they buy it, when they buy it, where they buy it, how often they buy it, how often they use it, how they evaluate it after the purchase and the impact of such evaluation on future purchases.


Management is the practice of organizing, directing and developing people, technology and financial resources to provide products and services through organizational systems. Managers are the ones who practice management. A manager can be thought of as a system diagnose and influencer who works on the people and other resources to carry out tasks and achieve goals.

   Managers must understand the totality of the organization and factors that influence it.

   They must be aware of the environment in which their systems operate.

   They engage in dynamic search to align factors and goals.

The main aim of this course is to provide basic knowledge of management in its entirety ranging art and science of management, evolution, theoretical framework and managements thought, functions of management, leadership, formal and informal organisation, performance appraisal, job functions among others. 

This course is a subject of considerable interest in the field of Business Administration/Economics cum management. The main aim of this course is to provide basic knowledge elementary economics, essentials of management and economics, characteristics and area of managerial coverage, the subject matter of managerial economics and its kin vis-à-vis the relationship and its interrelatedness   among   other   managerial   disciplines,   practicable   economic instruments/tools: Demand/Supply Analysis, Cost of Production Analysis, Market Analysis and other managerial matters such organization management functions and decision making process.


This course is a subject of considerable interest in the field of Business Administration/Accountancy cum management. The main aim of this course is to provide basic knowledge of company securities, management and winding up procedure. The course will also educate the students about partnerships as a business organization. After the successful completion of this course, the student should be able to know: (a) how companies are financed (b) how people become members of a company. (c) how directors and company secretaries are appointed, their duties and how they are removed. (d) the different company meetings and how they are convened. (e)  the measures put in place to protect minority shareholders and how they could enforce any breach of director’s duties if the majority fail to do so. (f) the different methods to wind up or dissolve a company. (g) what  a  partnership  is  and  the  nature  of  the  partnership  and  how  it  may  be dissolved.


Financial Management is a course which is concerned mainly with raising funds in the most economic and suitable manner; using these funds as profitably (for a given risk level) as possible; planning future operations, and controlling current performance and future developments through financial accounting, budgeting, statistical analysisand other means.

The course contents consist of An Introduction to Business Ethics; Ethical Principles in Business; Moral Development and Reasoning; Ethical Theory; Ethics, Justice and Business; The Business Systems; Ethics and Environmentalism; The Ethics of Job Discrimination; Individuals in the Organization; Corporations and Corporate Governance; Board of Directors;  Creditors and Credit Procedures; Activities of Shareholders;  Corporate Social Responsibilities.


Understanding the environment within which the business has to operate is very important for running a business unit successfully at any place. Because, the environmental factors influence almost every aspect of business, be it its nature, its location, the prices of products, the distribution system, or the personnel policies. Hence it is important to learn about the various components of the business environment, which consists of the economic aspect, the socio-cultural aspects, the political framework, the legal aspects and the technological aspects etc.


The origin of business policy can be traced back to 1911, when the Harvard Business School introduced an integrative course management aimed at providing general management capability and generalist approach to problem solving situations. The purpose of strategic issues that affect the future of a business firm has been a continual attempt in the subject of business policy, increasing complexity and accelerating change in the environment made the planned policy paradigm irrelevant since the needs of a business could no longer be served by policy-making. The term ‘Business Policy’ has been used traditionally through new title such as strategic management, corporate strategy and policy are used extensively.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is taken at the penultimate level and it is fundamental to understanding a very crucial aspect of microeconomics. Topics to be discussed are usually mathematically demanding and students are also expected to be geometrically-savvy. Basically, topics such as the mathematical treatment of the general equilibrium microeconomics coupled with the exchange theory, offer curves and contract curves will be extensively treated. Also, capital theory will be introduced to the students and the various types of production function will be explained.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is concerned with issues related to the theory and application of production economics. Subject matter includes traditional neo-classical theory of the firm, duality theory, and other issues and topics related to agricultural production economics. Theoretical models and empirical applications are introduced and discussed. Theory of the firm with emphasis on product supply, factor demand, and resource allocation. Both constant (price-taking) and flexible (price-making) product and factor price cases are considered. Theoretical properties of alternative production function models are explored


This course also deals the study of the economic action of individuals and well group of individuals which include particular firm and household as it relates to prices and wages. Particularly, the deals with welfare economics to evaluate the social desirability of alternative allocation of resources. 

In general the deals with the study of the various contributions of notable economists to the development of economics as the field of study.  Since the ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood.

Generally, this subject is designed to introduce students to the basics and rudiments of Economic Planning. In this course, attention is shifted to those theories, practices, processes and strategies of economic planning adopted by Nigeria, some selected developing countries and other selected developed countries for desired economic growth and development in this contemporary World.

The course is a continuation of ECO 303. It is designed to deal with macroeconomics concepts such as: problems of unemployment and inflation; IS-LM analytical apparatus in discussion of the relative effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy. These will be related to economies of the world.

The course is a continuation of ECO 205 designed to build strong mathematical background needed to aid students develop analytical skills required to solve Economics problems. It is planned to familiarise students with basic mathematics concepts and operations related to Economics. Particular emphasis will be placed on learning about how to use these methods in order to analyse economic issues and problems.

Growth of income, employment, wages and prices.Public development institutions, National income and expenditure.Monetary and fiscal policies.Monetary institutions.Trade and Transport systems, contributions of sectors of the Nigerian economy to national output, relationship between these sectors.Role of national institutions.Economic development and social change.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The course will lay an indepth understanding of Applied Economics which involves applying economic theories into practise (real economic situations) towards understanding economic growth while also giving understanding to the Issues, Dimensions and Analysis on unemployment, poverty and income distributions. The course will also look into controversies and opportunities in foreign investment and foreign aid.

COURSE JUSTIFICATION:

This course lays a solid foundation on Applied Economic theory. It is important to have preliminary knowledge on how the economy responds to the application of economic theories. Is there a divergence or convergence in it application? If yes or   no, why? What can be used to correct for errors found in economic theories applicability?

COURSE OUTLINE:

Growth poverty and Income Distribution, the population debates, unemployment, Education and development, Monetary and Fiscal policy, Traded theory and development experience, direct foreign investment and foreign aid, Global Interdependence and the New International Economic Order.



One of the areas of the financial industry that appears to be the least harmed by the current market turmoil is the Islamic finance industry. The Nigerian banking reform precipitated the adoption of Islamic banking and finance in 2009 as additional door to banking mechanism in the country. However, the implementation of the Islamic banking or non-interest banking has generated a lot of debate, specifically because its foundations are based on Islamic religion. 

Islamic Finance is a one unit second semester undergraduate course for Economics student. The course will lay an in-depth understanding of Islamic financing while giving thorough understanding to the concept of Musharakah, Mudarabah, Murabahah

This course is basically on Islamic Finance which is an aspect of financing that deals with financing on the primary basis of no interest rate. How they go about their practise in comparism to the conventional banks is definitely an interesting and enlightened area to look into as economist. The topics covered include the difference between the capitalist and the Islamic economy, Asset backed financing, Present practise of Islamic banking, Musharakah, Mudarabah, Murabahah etc




This course equips students with basic knowledge to understand Monetary Economics and how the market for financial institution works. It also discusses the batter Economy, Money: its Functions, Characteristic, Types and its evolution, as well as commercial Banking and theories of banking Banking regulation and supervision(definition & regulation agencies, bank examination and supervision, competition and monopoly in commercial banking), commercial and merchant Banking in Nigeria(definitions, developments and roles in economic development), Development Finance Institutions(definition, types and roles), Financial Intermediation (definition, Bank VS Non-Bank Financial intermediation) Financial Markets (money and capital market),Central Banking(definition and function)

 


This course gives students a deeper understanding of what the the trends in labour market and how to apply the labour market theories to real life scenario. Human Resource problems in LDCs especially in Nigeria such as labour migration e.t.c. Unemployment (causes, implication an its situation in Nigeria), characteristics of the Nigeria’s Labour Market, Workers Mobility: Turnover & Migration Labour Market Institutions. In addition, students will be introduced to how Collective Bargaining works, formation, responsibilities of labour union and the theory of migration. Manpower policy (Definition and Goals, Nigerian Manpower policy), Manpower Planning (Definition, Rationale and process, Approaches to estimating Manpower requirement). Recent contemporary issues in Labour market and how this recent pandemic will affect the world labour markets.


This course describes the various theories of international trade which includes comparative advantage, absolute advantage, modern theories of trade and so on. International Finance, Foreign Trade Protection, Economics Integration, Balance of Payment, Foreign Aid Capital Flows, Contemporary International relations and Diplomacy with the use of international Economics.


This course discusses economic static and dynamics which includes comparative static. In addition, the various utility approach to consumer behavior will be introduced to students such as indifference curve (ordinalist), revealed preference theory and cardinalist utility theory. General equilibrium of exchange. The production and cost theories were reviewed including law of variable proportion, marginal rate of substitution and marginal technical rate of substitution. Various cost assosiated with production suc as everage cost, implicit or opportunity cost, explicit cost, marginal cost, avaerage cost e.t.c.  Equilibrium under different market structures which includes duopoly, oligolopy, monopoly, duopsony, monopolistic competition and perfect compition .  Pricing of factors of production which includes rent, interest rate, capital and profit. The underlying assumptions of these theories are to be critically analyzed in order to situate the applicability to individuals, societies and economies.

This course is basically on Islamic Finance which is an aspect of financing that deals with financing on the primary basis of no interest rate. How they go about their practise in comparism to the conventional banks is definitely an interesting and enlightened area to look into as economist. The topics covered includes Ijarah, Salam, Istisna, Murabahah Fund,  , Bai’-al-dain, Mixed Fund, The principle of limited liability, Waqf, Baitul-Mal, Joint stock, Inheritance under debt, The Perfomance Of the Islamic Banks etc

Islamic Finance is a one unit second semester undergraduate course for Economics student. The course will lay an in-depth understanding of Islamic financing while giving thorough understanding to the concept of Murabahah, Ijarah, Salam, Istisna

One of the areas of the financial industry that appears to be the least harmed by the current market turmoil is the Islamic finance industry. The Nigerian banking reform precipitated the adoption of Islamic banking and finance in 2009 as additional door to banking mechanism in the country. However, the implementation of the Islamic banking or non-interest banking has generated a lot of debate, specifically because its foundations are based on Islamic religion.


Development Economics II is a two unit second semester undergraduate course for Economics student. This course guide will give you an insight to development economics and follow up/continuation to development economics I in year three first semester.

The course will lay an in-depth understanding of development economics while giving thorough understanding to the economic and non-economic determinants of underdevelopment in less developing countries, understanding of Dualism, balanced and un-balanced growth as a theory towards economic development, international trade and aid policy issues and case studies.

Economic Development, which is an extension to a more broader discuss of what is really happening in the economy and the players of the economy. The topics covered include Governance and Corruption, Civil Society and Development, Globalization and Poverty, Equity and well-being.


Fiscal Federalism, The Theory of Grant and its roles in economic development; Incidence of tax: Division of Functions, Revenue Allocation in Nigeria; Fiscal policy: The Nigeria Experience in Budget Evaluation and budgeting for efficient economic management. Public Debts Management in Nigeria


The need to provide quantitative measures to economic variables, indices and indicators suggests the need for econometrics as another branch of the economic science. Econometrics is an acronym of two concepts obtained from economics (ECONO) and metrics (METRICS). Economic theories postulates relationship between economic variables; in terms of signs, but the size (magnitude) and significance of these relationships are not known to economists until the tool of econometrics is employed to investigate and quantify these variables. The course requires that the students are equipped with the knowledge of economic theory, mathematics and statistics in order to have a full grasp of the knowledge of econometrics. As a build-up on ECO308 – Introductory Econometrics II – this course relies largely on the use of the matrix approach in modeling complex multivariate relationships.


The need to provide quantitative measures for economic variables, indices and indicators suggests the need for econometrics as another branch of the economic science. Econometrics is an acronym of two concepts obtained from economics (ECONO) and metrics (METRICS). Economic theories postulates relationship between economic variables; in terms of signs, but the size (magnitude) and significance of these relationships are not known to economists until the tool of econometrics is employed to investigate and quantify these variables. The course requires that the students are equipped with the knowledge of economic theory, mathematics and statistics in order to have a full grasp of the knowledge of econometrics.


The course is designed to cover theories of consumption and savings, investment, demand for and supply of money and inflation. In addition, instruments of macroeconomic policies were explained to the students. Specifically, the conventional theories of consumption and savings include the absolute income hypothesis, relative income hypothesis, the Kuznet Paradox, Life Cycle Hypothesis and the Permanent Income Hypothesis (PIH). Also, the theories of investment and capital  include the accelerator (fixed and flexible) theories, the Stock Adjustment Hypothesis, the Permanent Accelerator Theory and the Marginal Efficiency Hypothesis of Keynes (1936). More so, the money market sector of the economy is examined. Theories of Money Demand and Money Supply were reviewed. In addition, macroeconomic policies which encompass both the monetary and fiscal policies are analyzed. Theories of inflation and price movement are also examined. These include the demand-pull theory, supply-push theory, monetary theory, structural theory, wage-push, cost-push and profit push theories. More so, macroeconomic theories of inflation such as the rational expectation theory were considered. The underlying assumptions of these theories are to be critically analyzed in order to situate the applicability to individuals, societies and economies.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course largely centers on providing theoretical expositions on the macroeconomic goals of economic growth, full employment, price stability, and balance of payment. In theory, these objectives are considered separate; there are possible trade-offs in practice. A full-scale achievement of any of these macroeconomic objectives is not possible as doing so would create another problem for the economy. These trade-offs have been known in the literature as Okun’s Law, Phillip-Curve relationships. The former has to do with the trade-off between output and employment while the latter has to do with the trade-off between inflation and employment. For economic growth, both the endogenous and exogenous theories would be examined by the trade theory to capture the balance of payment equilibrium aspects of the macroeconomic objectives.

 

CONTACT SCHEDULE: 10am-12pm

 

Week I: INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE.

The course introduces theories of the output-employment relationship as enunciated in the Okun's (1963) framework. Also, the relationship, as well as trade-off between

inflation and employment, is explained with the use of the Phillip Curve. Both the short-run and long-run dynamics of this relationship are evaluated. More so, the various theoretical expositions of this relationship are examined. Also, the advanced theories of growth such as the neoclassical (exogenous) growth model and the endogenous models of growth are highlighted. The basic assumptions and equilibrium conditions (or steady-state) are examined. The positions of the trade cycle in terms of Keynesian, Monetarist and Neo-Classical propositions are further analyzed.

 

Week II: OKUN’S LAW – OUTPUT-EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP 

In this week, the relationship between output and employment would be explained with the Okun’s Law. This law posited that for every 1 percent increase in unemployment for an economy, output loss is an additional 2 percent production capacity for such an economy. The robustness of this relationship is essential for discussion and the practicability to economies of the world would be evaluated.

 

Week III: PHILLIP CURVE – THE INFLATION-EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP

The Phillip Curve posited that there exists an inverse relationship between inflation and employment generation in an economy. The more jobs created, the more prices become unstable. For the robustness of this relationship, both the short-run and the long-run dynamics of this relationship will be highlighted.

 

WEEK IV: EXOGENOUS THEORIES OF GROWTH – BASIC ASSUMPTIONS AND MODEL SET-UP

The neoclassical theories of growth were popularized by Solow (1956). The basic assumptions of the theories would be examined and the contributions of later writers will be highlighted. The prominent contributor is Swan (1956). Based on the underlying assumptions, the model will be set-up.

 

WEEK V: EXOGENOUS THEORIES OF GROWTH – STEADY STATES AND DETERMINANTS

The steady-state analysis, in tandem with the determining factors of the model, will be examined. Various scenarios would be considered and the implications for the economy are evaluated.

 

WEEK VI: EXOGENOUS THEORIES OF GROWTH – STYLIZED FACTS

Stylized facts are long-standing conclusions reached based on the economic theories.  These facts are highlighted and discussed with the students as take-away from the model.

 

WEEK VII: ENDOGENOUS THEORIES OF GROWTH – BASIC ASSUMPTIONS AND VARIANTS

Unlike the exogenous (neoclassical) theories of growth, the endogenous model considers technical know-how, technological advancement, and knowledge coupled with its spillovers as being determined within the model. The basic assumptions of the theories would be examined and the contributions of later writers will be highlighted. Prominent contributor includes Lucas (1972). Based on the underlying assumptions, the model will be set-up.

 

WEEK VIII: ENDOGENOUS THEORIES OF GROWTH – MODELLING FRAMEWORKS

There are many variants of the endogenous theories of growth. As a result, the various modeling frameworks; depending on the focus of endogeneity – technology, technical know-how, or knowledge are all examined for clarity's sake.

 

WEEK IX: ENDOGENOUS THEORIES OF GROWTH – STEADY STATES AND DETERMINANTS

The steady-state analysis, in tandem with the determining factors of the model, will be examined. Various scenarios would be considered and the implications for the economy are evaluated.

 

WEEK X: ENDOGENOUS THEORIES OF GROWTH – STYLIZED FACTS

Stylized facts are long-standing conclusions reached as regards the theories. These facts are highlighted and discussed with the students as take-away from the model.

 

 

WEEK XI: MID-SEMESTER ASSESSMENT

Students will be examined in the areas that have so far been covered in the Semester. This will afford students an opportunity for a revision of all topics that have already been taken.

 

WEEK XII: TRADE CYCLE – CONCEPTUAL CLARIFICATION AND THEORETICAL POSITIONS

Trade cycle, otherwise known as the business cycle, is a concept used in describing economic fluctuations. It is a concept used in describing alternating periods of expansion and contraction in economic activity. There are four phases viz; recession, through and recovery, and expansion.

 

WEEK XIII: REVISION AND QUIZ COMPETITION

A quiz competition will be put up in order to elicit feed-back from the students. The students will be grouped into five. Individual participation will also be encouraged as any member of the group will be called upon to answer questions or explain a concept on behalf of the group. This will let the students embark on self-evaluation in preparing for the examination.

 

The following are resource materials for further reading

REQUIRED TEXTS

·       Advanced Macroeconomics, Fourth Edition, by David Romer, McGraw Hill Irwin.

·       The Economics of Growth – Phillip Aghion and Peter Howell, The MIT Press, Cambridge, London.

·       Macroeconomics, 6th Edition, Oliver Blanchard and David R. Johnson, Pearson.

 

REQUIREMENTS

·       Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

·       To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

·       A mid-semester evaluation as part of the Continuous Assessment is mandatory

·       Assignments must be submitted online

·       An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is required to be able to register for the succeeding semester or access to examination results.

 

GRADING SYSTEM

Mid-Semester Evaluation            20%

Assignment                               15%

Attendance                               5%

Examination                              60%

 


The course is planned to take students through the planning, organisation and operations of rural and community media. It will expose students to the concept of community and demographic of rural people. Also, the status, philosophy and objectives of rural media in information management and national development will be explained.

The course focuses on exposing the students to the new communication technologies relevant to the operations of the media industry. It take them through different online media platforms and equip them with necessary skills of using them in the mass media industry.

The course aims at improving the Public Speaking prowess of the Students by taking them through the rudiments of Public Speaking.

Production of the Broadcast Media contents. Using graphic design principles and visual communication in video editing, preparing Montages, preparing and manipulating recorded and already edited clips, grabbing/ capturing from external storages (Importing), exporting. Preparation of promo and Programme intro.


The course is designed to equip communication students with the skills necessary to design, implement, and evaluate effective behaviour change communication interventions for health related issues such as HIV/AIDS, Maternal Mortality, Disease Control, etc.

Specialised reporting has become a necessary part of Journalism because of the need to address the inadequacies presented by straightforward news reports. The society is getting more and more complex with time so are the people. Mere news stories are no longer adequate to address the yearnings of the complex human societies for complex angles to stories.

Therefore, this course will focus on advanced instruction and practice in writing News Stories on specialized subjects such as crime, courts, political, environment, agriculture, science and technology, conflicts, sports and the like.


The objective of Investigative journalism is to teach students the principles of unearthing hidden facts that are of public interest, positive or negative. Students will get insight into how to investigate a wide range of issues among which are criminal, political, financial corruption and other vices in the society which other people try to hide.

This course aims to introduce students to the various presentation techniques in the broadcast media and to help them understand how these techniques affect meaning. Students will develop their own presentation skills in order to achieve a specific style and will understand how the way they present information can affect the way that information is understood by an audience.

Media systems are embedded within wider social, political, economic, and cultural systems. Analysis of types of media systems should be focused on understanding their relationships with other social sub-systems. In practice, most comparative analysis of media systems is focused not on media systems in their totality but on sets of elements related to news media, political communication, and media policy(s).


DESCRIPTION

This course will explain and provide guidance to students in the preparation forjournalistic use of various kinds of critical articles and reviews dealing with the fine and popular arts.The course is especially designed for professional and academic needs of studentsoffering a degree in Journalism and Mass Communication.

It will expose students to the basic concepts of journalistic criticism as a means of givingguidance in reporting and criticizing the arts. T will also help the students achieve the development of a sound critical mind that will put them in good stead for future critical work in arts. The coursewill nurture the students into professional art critics who will appreciate the powerof the fine and popular arts in our individual and collective lives.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES                                                                                                                            Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

1.      Appreciate the fine and popular arts and apply the basic principles of criticism in reporting and evaluating them.

2.      Apply the components and techniques of critical writing and how to write critical articles and reviews on the fine and popular arts.

3.      Operate in professional contexts and roles, pitch a query, and do critical analysis of works of art

4.      Critically analyse and edit their work and that of others

 

COURSE CONTENT                                                                                                                                  WEEK 1                                                                                                                                                Introduction to Critical Writing and Reviewing.Meaning of Critical Writing; Critical Writing and Critical Thinking

WEEK 2                                                                                                                                                        Critical Writing and other Forms of Writing; Functions of Criticism; Theories of Criticism

WEEK 3                                                                                                                                                        Figures of Expression and literature tools                                                                                               

WEEK 4                                                                                                                                                        Components of Criticism: The Critic; Components of Criticism: Direct Data.

WEEK 5                                                                                                                                                        Components of Criticism: Indirect DataApproaches to Criticism                                         

Week 6                                                                                                                                                           Mid Semester Exams

WEEK 7                                                                                                                                                        Writing the Review, Writing the Critical Article

WEEK 8                                                                                                                                                        The Reviewer and the Critic; The Critical Writer’s Style

 

WEEK 9                                                                                                                                            Reviewing the Fine arts; Reviewing Books; Reviewing Drama

 

WEEK 10                                                                                                                                                      Reviewing Music; Reviewing TV and Motion Pictures

WEEK 11                                                                                                                                                      Revision exercises and course review

ASSIGNMENTS
To assess students’ grasp of the course, each student is expected to complete the following.
1. Review and Critic a book, any literature or any art. 10%
2. Mid semester tests/examination. 10%
3. Attendance and class participation- 5%                                                                                                          4. Poetry/Drama Performance-   15%

GRADING SYSTEM                                                                                                                      a. Attendance, assignments and class participation will account for 40% of the total score in this course.  b. The semester examination will account for the remaining 60%

 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Akinwalere I., (2014) Critical Writing and Reviewing, Lagos

 

NOTE: Schedule and syllabus are subject to change based on the needs of this class and at the lecturer's discretion.


The objective of this course is to further acquaint students with the skills of writing which is the foundation and bedrock of mass communication. The course builds further on MCM 105- Writing for the Mass Media I, with a view to exposing the students to various forms of writing in mass communication and the technicalities associated withy each.

Week One

Definition and profiling various issues relatimng to writing for the mass media.

Explain the importance of research and sources in writing.

 

Week Two

Explainations on what constitute a journalistic style.

Understand how to develop ear for writing.

 

Week Three

Explainations on what editing and proofreading are all about.

Understand  the reasons mass media are always in a hurry

Being conversant with media writing jargons

 

Week Four

Justifcation  on the reason we have a writing style for the mass media.


Week Five

Definition and Basics of Media Writing

Broadcast Style

 

Week Six

Print Style

Advertising Style

Week Seven

Public Relations Style

 Writing the Lead/Headlines

Ear for Writing

 

Week Eight

 Information Sources

Revising, Editing and proofreading

Organizing the Facts

 

Week Nine

Simple Story Structures Rewrite, Advance, Follow up

Media Writing: Skills And Practices

 

Week Ten

Perspectives in Media Writing

Writing For the On-Line Journalism

 

Week Eleven

Creative Media Writing

                Scripting

 

Week Twelve

Introductiuon to Pr Writing

Glossaries of media Writing

ASSIGNMENTS
To assess students’ grasp of the course, each student is expected to complete the following.
1. Write a term paper on a relevant model of management to be presented in classc 10 marks

2. Mid-semester tests/examination. 20%

3. Attendance and class participation- 5%

4. Group Individual assignment         15%

 

 

 

GRADING SYSTEM

A. Attendance, assignments and class participation will account for 40% of the total score in this course.
B. The end of semester examination will account for the remaining 60%.


Course Objectives                                                                                                                                              The aims and objectives of this course are such that at the end of the course, the students should be able to:

·         State the general principles and theories of management and how they are applied in media organisations

·         Administer media organisations especially in this age of media proliferations.

·         The course shall also acquaint the students with the knowledge of the pertinent legal and ethical issues revolving around contemporary media organisation management.

 

OUTLINE

Week 1

Meaning and Types of Media Management

Functions and Characteristics of Media Management

 

Week 2

Purpose of Media Management/Managerial Skills

Qualities/Duties of Media Managers

 

Week 3

Management Theories: Meaning and Relevance in Media Management

Classical Management Theories

 

Week 4
Behaviour and Human Relations Theories

Systems/Contingency Theory

 

Week 5

Quantitative Management Theories and TQM

Meaning and Types of Organisations

 

Week 6

Mid semester examination

 

Week 7

Nature/Features of Media Organisation Environment

Media Organisational Structures

 

Week 8

Departments in Media Organisations

Print Media Organisation                    -           newspaper, magazine

Broadcast Media Organisation           -           radio, television

PR and Advert Agencies                    -          

Sources of Revenue for Media Organisations

 

Week 9

Communication Process in Media Organisations

Performance Appraisal and Management by Objectives

 

Week 10

Motivations in Media Organisations

Handling Grievances, Complaints and Conflicts in Media Organisations

 

Week 11

Media Ownership and Control

Leadership Process in Media Organisations

Sources of Revenue for Media Organisations

 

 

Week 12

Media Management in the Age of Media Proliferation

Ethics and Social Responsibility in Media Management

 

ASSIGNMENTS
To assess students’ grasp of the course, each student is expected to complete the following.
1. Write a term paper on a relevant model of management to be presented in classc 10 marks

2. Mid-semester tests/examination. 20%

3. Attendance and class participation- 5%

4. Group Individual assignment         15%

 

 

 

GRADING SYSTEM

A. Attendance, assignments and class participation will account for 40% of the total score in this course.
B. The end of semester examination will account for the remaining 60%.


The course will expose students to the relevant history of the mass media in Nigeria. Students will study these significant events in Nigerian Mass Media. Also, the efforts of the pioneers of the Nigerian press with socio-political the situation of the era in which these newspapers were published.


Journalism in our society often requires the combination of visual and written information to both reach and inform a mass target audience. There is a difference between the photograph and the written representation which is that the camera is able to capture reality. Latest technologies in this field require well-trained personnel to function effectively with modern technologies allowing for photographs to be made in less than a second. This significant development in technology means that understanding subjects and materials photo-journalism is essential

Station Management and Operations is designed to broaden students’ knowledge on principles and skills of broadcast station organization, management and operations. This course highlights the general philosophy of broadcast station management and operational requirements and their practical applications in contemporary media organizations


 

COURSE CODE:  MCM 202

COURSE TITLE: EDITING AND GRAPHICS OF COMMUNICATION               

Course Syllabus and Outline

APRIL 2020

Lecturer: SANNI, Azeez 'Segun
Email: segunveteran@gmail.com, segunveteran@yahoo.com
Twitter: @segunveteran
Blog: http://www.segunveteran.wordpress.com

Introduction                                                                                                                                      This course, titled Editing and Graphics of Communication and coded MCM 202, is designed for 200 level undergraduate students of Mass Communication in Fountain University.

 Course Objectives

The aims and objectives of this course are as follows.

1.      Expose the students to the very first volume on Editing and Graphics in Nigeria and probably West Africa.

2.      Prepare the students for the knowledge that can make them professionals in the area of graphics.

3.      Help the students to transpose this knowledge into skills with which they can impart others.

4.      Make the students versatile text and graphics editor.

 

Course Objectives

At the end of this semester, the students should be able to: • decipher the details of this course • unfold the responsibilities that await them in the course and how to carry them out • obtain the advice and instructions they need to follow the course through

 

OUTLINE

Week 1

Graphic Features of Communication

Introduction to Editing and Graphics of Communication

Format, Forms and Uses of Graphics

 

Week 2

Graphic Features of Communication

Devices of Editing and Graphics of Communication

Input, Output and Storage Devices85

 

Week 3

Typography

Text as Communication

Anatomy of Type

 

Week 4

Typography

The Graphic Process

Text Editing, Graphics and Communication

 

Week 5

Reasons for Editing

Introducing the Sub Editors

 

Week 5

Headline Casting

Editing of Text Graphics

 

Week 6

 Image Editing, Captions, Layout and Design

 

Week 7

Photographs

 

Week 8

Mid-Semester Examination

 

Week 9

Caption Writing

 

Week 10

 Layout and Design

 The Printing Process…



The course examines the principles of media and community relations and its application by corporate organization for effective image and reputation management. It aims at exposing the students to the various techniques, tactics and practices of media relations as well as community relations to achieve good corporate image. It also touches aspects of event and strategic planning and implementation/execution by a corporate organistion be it commercial or non-governmental organisations. This course will train students to be effective community crises managers, programme planners, executors and evaluators to boost organizational reputation through various media and community channels. 45h (T); E


The course examines the concept of research methodology in the Social Sciences with particular focus on Mass Communication. This includes the various forms of research methods like survey, content analysis, experimentation, FGD, IDI, KII and observation, ethnography and case study. It equips the students with requisite knowledge and technical skills of the 21st century academic research engagement.  At the end of the course, students will uptake a mini-research on a communication problem as a way of equipping them with confidence in conducting their first degree research project with little or no itch. 45h(T);C


The crux of the course includes the rudiments of public speaking from topic selection to delivery and post-presentation analysis. At the end, students should be able to effectively deliver short speeches with good eye-contact and control/management of stage fright. It should expose them to varieties of techniques and technologies (power point and other presentation aids) involved in public speaking in the ICT driven age.  30h (T); CE


This course examines the rudiments, importance and relevance of advertising to industrial, commercial and government establishments. It focuses on the basic concepts of the course with a look at creativity and concept development in advertising. It takes the students through the process of producing advertising messages for radio, television, print and online media. 30h (T)C


The course is designed to expose students to relevant laws, regulations and ethics in Mass Communication.  These   include laws on defamation, sedition, harmful and obscene publication, privacy, libel, press freedom, copyright as well as laws relating to advertising and public relations


This course is designed to explore idea conception/generation, scripting and different stages of documentary production. It shall focus on types, research, style and techniques of documentary production. The difference between documentary and film scripts as well as productions shall also be established. Students are required to produce a documentary at the end of the course.


The course shall focus on planning and executing advertising campaigns. It shall expose students to media of advertising, copywriting, media planning and buying as well as . It is a combination of theoretical understanding of advertising and   campaigns and research, advertising strategy, marketing research and brand management etc


The course focuses on building the capacity of the students to initiate, plan and  organize events of all sorts. These events range from strictly formal to non-formal ones. The features, planning, budgeting, monitoring and complete execute of events as project management will be focused on.


African had been participating in the global arena for centuries. This participation was however as a subservient continent. The seminar work of Walter Rodney on How Europe underdeveloped Africaremains an unparalleled intervention in Africa’s attempts to grapple with its past and present predicaments, particularly its economic, social and political dependence on other systems.

In the 1950s and 1960s, political opinion viewed political independence as the jumping of point for progress, the key which would open all doors. One after another, countries achieved independence, but this independence did not bring the necessaryconditions for improving the lot of the people. Quite the opposite.As the majority of African countries gained their independence from theircolonial masters, thechallenge of development became the ideology for governance.

Therefore, the course discusses Africa politics in relations with monumental developments in Africa in the pre and post-colonial period. It provides an understanding and explanation of the peculiar features, problems and intricacies of politics in Africa. This is not to suggest that Africa represents a monolithic geopolitical and cultural entity.

COURSE OBJECTIVES 

Between the decades of the 1960s-Africa’s decades of independence-and of the 1990s- when the whole continent eventually achieved independence and freedom from institutionalized and legalized colonialism, racism, racial discrimination and apartheid-there have been noticeable changes and development in Africa.

The objectives therefore, is to introduce students to some of the contextual issues in African Politicaldevelopment. This is to provide a critical backdrop against which a more nuanced argument of some scholars that concludes that the African state is ‘lame leviathan’‘a neo-colonial task’, ‘a rentier state’, ‘a patrimonial state’ and ‘rogue state’.

COURSE REQUIREMENT 

As a matter of fact, for any student to be able to scale through at the end of this 

course, the underIisted conditions must be duly fulfilled: 

Class attendance 

Seminar / assignment 

Mid-semester test 

Semester examination 


However, the evaluation of students in this course will be based on 30% continuous assessment which will be composed of class attendance, 

assignment/seminar and test, while 70% is for the semester examination. 

Meanwhile, the students are reminded that failure to obtain 70% attendance 

would automatically disqualify any students from sitting for the final exams. 

Accordingly; to allow students to be quite familiar and exposed to some ideas in 

the African Politics, the mode of instruction will include formal lectures and seminar presentations by students on the assigned topics. 

4.  COURSE OUTLINE

i. Introduction: Nature and Scope 

ii. Africa in Historical Context 

Politics in Africa before Colonialism

Establishment of Colonial Rule in Africa.

Different systems of Colonial Administration and Economic policies.

iii. Africa since Independence

The Role of the State.

The Features of African Politics

iv. Approaches to the Study of Africa Politics. 

Modernization School/ Development School 

Underdevelopment School/ Dependency School 

The Neo-Marxist School 

v. The Nature of Africa Politics.

Origin of the problems of African Politics.

The impact of Colonialism in Africa. 

Contemporary Problems in African Crises.

Militarization of African Politics.

vi. Neo-Colonialism and Dependency in Africa.

Theories of Neo-colonialism 

Features of Neo-colonialism.  

The Origin Economic Crisis in Africa

The Impacts of Structural Adjustment Programmes

Debt Crises in Africa.

vii. Africa in International Affairs.

Democratization in Africa

The course is a comparative examination of the inter-relationships between law and politics in different African countries by studying the political significance of the judicial process during the colonial and post-independence period. Politics involves not only governments, legislative, and politician, but also a wide range of groups and individuals. Different interest, values, opinions and perspectives are responsible for many of the conflicts that occur in politics and make achieving the common good of the political community a difficult challenge.   

Human activity, be it economic, social or political, is controlled by laws or procedures of various types. Basically, however, the function of law is to protect, preserve and defend the members of social against internal disorder or external threat. Thus, although the entire gamut of human behaviour is controlled by appropriate procedure or “rules of the game”. 

Therefore, our focus here is on the politics and its relation to stability and change in Africa.Neither law nor politics is value free. They do not operate independently. They do share the common concern for development which is the result of constant interaction of individuals in society.Thus, while politics determines the formulations and implementations of decision making in the societies; law attempts to regulate that interaction through institutions, norms and processes evolved on certain assumption of human nature and behavior. 

COURSE OBJECTIVE

The course is design to critically examine issues involves in politics and administration of legal issues in the political development in Africa. It isspecificallyaims to influence individual decision making in such a way to advance social policies and values.

COURSE REQUIREMENT 

As a matter of fact, for any student to be able to scale through at the end of this course, the underIisted conditions must be duly fulfilled: 

Class attendance 

Seminar / assignment 

Mid-semester test 

Semester examination 


However, the evaluation of students in this course will be based on 30% continuous assessment which will be composed of class attendance, 

assignment/seminar and test, while 70% is for the semester examination. 

Meanwhile, the students are reminded that failure to obtain 70% attendance 

would automatically disqualify any students from sitting for the final exams. 

Accordingly; to allow students to be quite familiar and exposed to some ideas in Politics and Law in Africa, the mode of instruction will include formal lectures and seminar presentations by students on the assigned topics. 


COURSE OUTLINE 

Week 1: Introduction 

Week 2: Understanding Politics

Week 3: The Concept of Democracy 

Week 4: Perspective on Law in Political Context 

Week 5: Constitution and Constitutionalism 

Week 6: Conceptualizing Politics and Law in Africa

Week 7: Historical Trajectories of the Study of Law and Politics

Week 8: Politics and Law: Understanding the Nexus

Week 9: Understanding the Rule of Law

Week 10: Rule of Law and Democratic Consolidation

Week 11: Militarization of Politics in Africa

Week 12: Case studies: Politics and Conflict

Nigeria state, as its presently constituted, originated from colonial experience, and it has been strongly conditioned and influenced by that history. Historically, until the arrival of the British Colonialists, the vast regions that constitute the present day Nigeria were made up of various empires included the Bornu Empire, the Oyo Empire, The Benin Kingdom, the Sokoto Caliphate, e.t.c. Thus, the pre-colonial historical processes of the state formations by the various communities were effectively frozen by British Colonial incursions during the last quarter of 19th century.


However, with persistent agitations, after almost a century, various pre-colonial ethnic systems, numbering over 250 were brought together to constitute the Nigerian modern state. This, of course eventually achieved through several constitutional development.


Therefore, the course intends to historicize the history of modern Nigeria from the pre-colonial government, through the colonial government and how the persistent agitations for independence led to several constitutional arrangements which cumulatively formed a binding document after the independence of Nigeria.


COURSE OBJECTIVE

Nigerians were at least, under the colonial rule effectively for about 60 years. It was during these periods that the country was shaped, created and constructed. The main objective of the course is to introduce and familiarize students with the formation of modern Nigeria through several constitutional developments. This is essential because it will expose students to understand political issues that surround the constitutional events.


COURSE REQUIREMENT

As a matter of fact, for any student to be able to scale through at the end of this course, the underlisted conditions must be duly fulfilled:

Class attendance

Seminar/assignment

Mid-semester test

Semester examination

However, the evaluation of students in this course will be based on 30% continuous assessment which will be composed of class attendance, assignment/seminar and test, while 70% is for the semester examination. Meanwhile, the students are reminded that failure to obtain 70% attendance would automatically disqualify any students from sitting for the final exams.

Accordingly, to allow students to be quite familiar and exposed to some ideas in the Constitutional Development in Nigeria, the mode of instruction will include formal lectures and seminar presentations by students on the assigned topics.

COURSE OUTLINE

The State Formation

Pre-colonial Government and Politics

Colonial Government in Nigeria

The Amalgamation of 1914

Nationalist Agitations for Nigeria’s Independence

The Development of Nigerian Constitution

The Making of Nigeria.

The course enhances students’ knowledge about democracy as a system of government and its processual and procedural attributes. It exposes students to salient and core areas of democratic practice and gives them insight into differing democratic success across electoral democracies in spite of uniformity of institutions and procedures

The course expands students’ knowledge about democratic system of government and democratic practice. It examines the epochal transition of democracy from classical/direct democracy to representative/indirect democracy. The course also discusses important areas of democratic practice including the working of the legislature, democratic strengthening, political financing, electoral uncertainty and electoral integrity.   


The course basically introduces students to the concept of inter-governmental relations, its principles and dynamics as well as its differing manifestations or dimensions across federal systems. It engages issues such as overview of the concept of federalism and its defining features as well as issues of contention in Nigerian federalism; concept of inter-governmental relations and its defining features as well as its differing manifestations or dimensions across federal democracies. The course also examines the impact of political context on the operation of inter governmental relations particularly in terms of regime type such as military dictatorship and civilian rule. Patterns of inter-governmental relations and the inherent politicking/intrigues are also engaged. At the level of resource management and distribution in federal systems, the course examines inter-governmental fiscal relations in Nigeria as well as the controversy generated by the issue of resource control in the country.


The course introduces students to the historical evolution of the Nigerian state and defining characteristics of Nigerian politics. . The course also discusses important areas of Nigerian politics including federal practice, party politicking, election management, legislature-executive relations, the military question, cost of governance, state-civil society relations and constitutional/electoral reform.   


This course offers an insight into the federalism in a variety of different democratic political systems. Federalism is presented as a coherent set of mechanisms, procedures and institutions designed to manage specific challenged that confront many contemporary democracies. During the course of the semester, we will examine the basic mechanisms of federalism, the reasons that led to the development of this innovative approach to governance at specific moments in history, the institutions that have been developed to support the federal ideal, the politics of day-to-day federalism, and how federal systems manage key public policy issues. The students will gain a mastery of the practice of federalism in United State of America, Germany, Australia, Canada and Nigeria. 


This course aims at providing insight into the major theoretical and empirical explanation of the causes of global inequality in wealth distribution and why the third world countries have remained perpetually underdeveloped and dependent even after decades of political independence. The discussion will cover areas such as the introduction to the concepts of development, underdevelopment, Third World and dependency, providing students with the theoretical and empirical explanations to the causes of underdevelopment and dependency, enabling students to evaluate the relevance of these explanations to contemporary Third World development crisis and providing students with the understanding of the Third World states and their response to development.


Public Administration in Nigeria is a course designed to expose students of Political Science and Public Administration to vital issues within related to Public Administration in Nigeria. The course examine origin of Nigerian public administration and its ecology, the nature of Nigerian civil service and associated issues related to the establishment of various public corporations in Nigeria. As a result of the nature of the course, mode of instruction would be formal weekly lectures and interactions between lecturer and the students.


Public Enterprises Management is a course designed to educate students of Political Science and Public Administration to some basic concept in Public Financial Administration. The course explain the concept of public finance and its administration, other concept such as element of government accounting system, planning in public sector, budgeting and budgeting process, control and accountability in public office, financial reporting and auditing in the public sector.



This course guide gives an overview of major political ideas in their historical context. It focuses on the concepts such as meaning and nature of political ideologies such as Monarchism, Liberalism, Democracy, Socialism, Fascism, Feudalism and Anarchism. Issue of political change and citizen’s attitudes to social change and revolution are part of the content of the course.


This course examines some basic methods and techniques for generating and analyzing data in political science through the use of both qualitative and quantitative research methods that attempts to make causal inferences for the explanation of political phenomenon. As a result of the nature of the course, the mode of instruction would be formal weekly lectures and interactions between Lecturer and the students.


Comparative politics as a course of study is designed to explain the meaning, nature and scope of the subject matter. It examines the objectives and importance of comparative politics. The logic and methodology of comparative politics will also be examined. Problems, major components and themes of comparative politics will also be analyzed. Some of the conceptual approaches and theories to the study of the course will be explored.


Public policy making and analysis provides students with the opportunity to gain a mastery and an in -depth understanding of approaches to public policy and techniques for its analysis. It aims at giving students an understanding of the techniques used in the formulation, implementation and evaluation of Public Policies for solving societal needs. This course will also make students to take better and rational decision among alternatives. The course provides in-depth understanding of the Basic Concepts in Public Policy; Why Study Public Policy; Nature and Scope of Public; Policy Policy-Making Process and Decision-Making Process. It also covers Dynamics of Public Policy Process, Policy and Decision-Making Theories. Tools and Techniques in Public Policy Analysis will equally be well explored.


COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

A mid-semester evaluation as part of the Continuous Assessment is mandatory 

Assignments must be submitted online

An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is required to be able to register for the succeeding semester or access to examination results.

Personnel Management is a course that exposes students to the theories of personnel administration and how the theories can be put into practice. It covers the topics such as Origin, evolution, definition and place of personnel management in organizations, planning the organization's human resources, the classification of positions, recruitment policies and procedures, staff selection process, compensation, training and development and motivation 

CONTACT SCHEDULE: 8am-10am

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

A mid-semester evaluation as part of the Continuous Assessment is mandatory 

Assignments must be submitted online

An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is required to be able to register for the succeeding semester or access to examination results.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is aimed at acquainting the students with the ideas and concepts of Public Administration. The study will expose the students to issues in public administration such as Introduction to the basic concept of Public Administration, Public and Private Administration, the Scope of Public Administration, Public Administration as an Art and as a Science and Public Administration and Other Social Sciences. It will equally explore the New Dimensions of Public Administration, General Aspects of Administration, Approaches to the Study of Public Administration, Environment of Public Administration, Principles of Public Administration, Public Administration and Bureaucracy, the Problem and Failure of Bureaucracy in Africa, Chief Executive, and Legislature as a Board of Directors. Various controls over administration such as Executive Control over Administration, Parliamentary Control Administration Judicial Control over Administration, The Community Control over Administration, Internal Controls will equally be discussed. Lastly, an overview of Management  A Conceptual Analysis, Leadership, Planning, Coordination, Delegation, Communication, and Supervision will be explored

Course Description

The course aims at exposing students to a Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). It is well suited to analysing data from surveys and database. Advanced Social Statistics/SPSS will enable students to gain more skills on execution of the wide range of statistical analyses in order to prepare them for an efficient programmer in their research endeavour.

This is an introductory course in macro and micro sociology. The course will focus on both abstract level of sociology (looking at the social structure) and concrete level of day-to-day interactions. This means that the course will examine how social relations is formed and maintained among groups and societies as well as at the human agency level of interactions. The course will begin by introducing students to the phases of sociological analysis – that is the macro and micro levels – mostly used by sociological scholars to understand human relations and society. Students will learn about components of social structure and sociological perspectives on social structure. They will also learn about the relationships between social change and transformations in patterns of social interactions and how individuals contribute to all these changes. The main goals of this course are to help students have a better grasp of themselves and the social world around them as well as make them understand the roles they play in construction of everyday routine and how this shapes the world they live in.


This course examines aging and life course from a sociological viewpoint with strong emphasis on the social components of aging. Theoretical perspectives and research approaches are treated in relation to a variety of subject areas, including: health, living arrangements, family relationships, informal and formal support; work and retirement. The course also examines trends related to an aging population. Discussions cover other areas relating to family ties and aging, while further efforts have been made to cover the linkage between family life and other facets of social life in later life. The implications of an aging society and of research for social policy were also considered in relation to all core topics.

This course intends to introduce students to the scientific study of human population. At the end of the course students are expected to have a basic understanding of important concepts such as age structure, fertility, nuptiality, mortality and morbidity, migration, population projections, and demographic transition. Apart from these, students are expected to also have become familiar with data collection methods as applicable in demography as well as the most important demographic measures. Students are also expected to be able to address questions relating to the factors accounting for population change as well as the linkage between demographic factors and human development.

Society is at the centre of sociological studies. This explains why sociologists constantly strived to understand the relationship between society and its constituent elements with much emphasis on how both mutually influence each other. Specifically, this course examines the interaction between society and the mass media. It considers various theories of the press in relation to the key roles played by the media towards the development of society. Other important areas covered include media ownership and control, social representations of the media, how the media mirrors social inequality, as well as the impacts of new technologies on media practice.

The course aims at acquainting the students with the study and description of indigenous Nigerian society as it moves toward political independence from British rule/domination. The course employs analytical sociological and anthropological concepts to detail the patterns of socio-economic elements of continuity and change while focusing on the major problems of Nigerian societies, nature of urbanization, migration patterns and social mobility, social class and social inequalities, social problems attending development, and the changing family system.

The course aims at intimating students with the study of the social structure of contemporary African societies. In general terms, it is meant to be an introductory approach to the understanding of the workings of the institutions of society. Using the structural functionalism as a mode of analysis, the course looks at how societies in Africa are conceived of as having various parts that are not only interdependent but also functions in such a way that malfunction of any part affects the survival of the whole. The course takes a broad look at the social structure of African societies and tries to situate it within the prevailing socioeconomic and political structural maladjustment occasioned by the continent’s relationship with the Western World.

In this course students are introduced to the sociological analysis of the institution of family and it also offers them an understanding of families within contemporary Nigerian structure. The course focuses on social changes in family institution. It will begin by providing conceptual basis of sociological perspectives of family. It then focuses on the concept of marriage, kinship and family systems in Nigeria. We will consider how families are formed in the major ethnic groups that make up the country and look at changes occurring in this important institution. We will also take a deep look at occurrence of inter-ethnic marriages in the country, including the perceived language and cultural hindrances militating against such union. We will explore various challenges faced by families including abuse, battery and violence. Finally, we will consider the phenomenon of family dissolution including the causes and consequences on family members and friends.


This course examines a wide-range of contemporary sociological theories. Contemporary sociological theory is all about explaining and appreciating the contemporary social order and this course offers students an appreciation of the workings of (post) modern society. Throughout the duration of the course we will examine the theorists and the theoretical expositions on modern and post-modern societies. Students will be made to reflect on key theoretical issues, propositions and principles of theories such as social exchange, rational choice, symbolic interactionism, postmodernism, ethnomethodology and many others that will be discussed in the class. A key textbook needed for this course is Contemporary sociological theory (7th edition) by George Ritzer published by McGraw-Hill.


This course examines a wide-range of debates over development. It will explore how development is conceptualized and measured and how different ideas and ideologies have shaped and reshape the strategies and indices of development. The course will begin by examining the legacies of colonialism and its impact on the developments of developing societies. We will then explore the various theories of development from modernization, dependency, freedom, sustainable development, bottom-up, duality, etc theories and their explanations on the concept of development. We will consider the role of globalization in development among many topics. A key textbook needed for this course is Geography of Development: An Introduction to Development Studies (3rd edition) authored by Potter, RB, Binns, T, Elliot, J.A. and Smith, D. published by Pearson prentice-Hall.



This is an introductory course in macro and micro sociology. The course will focus on both abstract level of sociology (looking at the social structure) and concrete level of day-to-day interactions. This means that the course will examine how social relations is formed and maintained among groups and societies as well as at the human agency level of interactions. The course will begin by introducing students to the phases of sociological analysis – that is the macro and micro levels – mostly used by sociological scholars to understand human relations and society. Students will learn about components of social structure and sociological perspectives on social structure. They will also learn about the relationships between social change and transformations in patterns of social interactions and how individuals contribute to all these changes. The main goals of this course are to help students have a better grasp of themselves and the social world around them as well as make them understand the roles they play in construction of everyday routine and how this shapes the world they live in.


The objectives of this course among other things are to familiarise students with:

1.      The significance of knowledge in the society

2.      Socio – Historic context of knowledge of technology.

3.      Africa and Technology

4.      Indigenous science and Technology

5.      Future of technology and society


The objectives of this course among other things are to familiarise students with:

1.      The nexus of Sociology and Psychology.

2.      Application of Psychology to social life.

Understanding the determinants of social behaviour

The objectives of this course among other things are:

1.      To prepare students for the reality of unemployment in Nigeria.

2.      To open the views of the importance of job creation.

3.      To equip students with necessary skills and information needed to own businesses.

To educate students on business leadership

The objectives of this course among other things is to make students understand the socio -l historical context of gender relations in selected Western and African countries over time. It is also to evaluate the progress of women liberation movements. Theories of gender, with particular focus on Feminism would be critically examined.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

The course examines the concept of urbanization, emergence of cities, the phenomenon of urban growth in various parts of the world, labour migration and various forms of Labour migration in Nigeria and in other developing countries are crucial topics in academic discourse in the contemporary globalized societies. The course helps to have a deep understanding of urbanisation process and migration pattern as it shapes social interaction in West Africa and assists tremendously to unravel new forms of migration in the developing nations, particularly, Nigeria. Theories and economics of Labour migration will also be examined along with the concept of Brain Drain, its effects and consequences to the place of origin.

45 h(T) C

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Students of this course will learn about the concepts of Urbanisation and Migration, theoretical perspectives and the recent trends of Migration. Also the consequences of Brain drain on Nigeria as a place of origin. 45 h(T) C


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

The nature, structure, functions and dynamics of complex organizations. The concept of organization goals will be examined. The course will also examine the general characteristics of complex organizations, cross cultural analysis of organizations and the processes within organizations as well as the interaction between an organization and it environment. 45 h(T) C.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Students of this course will learn about the concepts of complex organizations, theoretical perspectives and the recent trends of Bureaucratic system.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

Discussion and assessment of theories of social cultural change as set forth by the classical theoreticians-Herbert Spencer, Auguste Comte, Karl Marx, Max Weber, etc. and modern theoreticians like Talcott parsons etc. Comparative considerations of some specific social theories and approaches. Methods of studying social change will also be examined. 45 h(T) C

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Students of this course will learn about the phenomenon of cultural change, meaning of the concept, types and nature of social change and theoretical perspectives and the recent trends of cultural change.


CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

Introduction to the history of labour in Nigeria. It includes the history of labour and unionism in the pre- colonial, colonial, post colonial and military eras in Nigeria. It also includes the examination of collective bargaining concept and leadership. Major theoretical perspectives such as Dunlop, conflict and system theories will be discussed.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course examines the field of labour studies and the place of working people and the labour movement in society. It provides an overview of Nigeria labour history, the ways unions are organized, why they matter, and which challenges they are facing today. Students of this course will learn about the concepts of industrial relations, collective bargaining concept and leadership, theoretical perspectives and the recent trends of Unionism in Nigeria.


Course Description

This course attempted to enlighten students on the perspectives of Africans especially their thought processes towards their environment, her heritage and the people. The Africans are oriented towards distinct social thoughts; therefore, this course provides the intellectual foundations of Africans and their survival pattern.This course was designed to critically furnish students on the variants and impacts of social thoughts peculiar to Africans and their civilization, political thinking and essentially their social life. The course also took cognizance of European influences (Afro-diasporic movements) on Africans while also discussing the African social theory. Proverbs, poems are the peculiar elements in Africa used to modify behaviour. The study also discusses some Africans and their social thoughts for collectivism. The study of African social is inevitable for African students particularly to organize the thinking of students to accommodate African culture and values.


Course Description

The course aims at exposing students to important statistical concepts that could be used to collect, analyze, interpret, and predict outcomes from data. Descriptive statistics will enable students to gain more insight on the basic concepts that could be used to describe data. This is a great beginner course for those interested in data science, more importantly, for sociology students who might be engaged in research enterprises. The following basic descriptive statistic would be considered; location of a distribution, mean, median, mode, geometric mean, harmonic mean, dispersion of a distribution, range, mean deviation, variance, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, frequency distribution, frequency polygon, histogram, bar chart, pie chart, ogive curve among many others.

This course introduces students to basic issues in citizenship, peace and conflict studies. It exposes students to the important role of the citizen in efforts at making his society peaceful and conflict-free. The concept of citizenship, state-citizen relations, anti-social behaviour, inter-group relations, inter-group conflicts, as well as role of international actors and women in peace-building are engaged in the course.

The course will take students through an overview of the concept of citizenship and its accompaniments like fundamental human rights, relationship between the state and the citizen, phenomenon of anti-social behaviours, inter-group relations and inter-group conflicts, conflict and its nature, peace-mediation, peace keeping and peace building, as well as the role of women and international institutions in promoting global peace.

The course is designed for the used of past tenses,.types of French past tenses. Le passé  composé (Known in English as conventional past tense) Le passé simple  (simple past tense). Le passé antérieur  ( past anterior) Le Futur antérieur  ( the Future  perfect tense as well as French composition and oral French.

COURSE OUTLINE 

WEEK 1: INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE

The past tenses are used for expressing , describing or stating actions and for

narrating event that have been concluded in the past. Le passé composé ( known in

English as conversational past tense, ) le passé simple ( simple past tense ), le passé

antérieur ( past anterrior ), Le future antérieur ( the future perfect tense).

WEEK 2. LE PASSÉ COMPOSÉ

- Verbs conjugated in the perfect tense with avoir,

- Verbs conjugated with être .

WEEK 3 LE PLUS QUE PERFECT .

- Difference between the plus – que –perfect and the passé compose

WEEK 4 : LES ADVERBS.

- Adverbs of manner.

- Adverbs of manner formed with – ment

- Adjectives used with verbs to form Adverbs of Manner.

- Adverbs of Time

- Adverbs of Place

- Adverbs of Quantity

WEEK 4: LES PRONOM PERSONNEL

- Les pronoms sujet et les pronoms tonique

- Les pronom complément d’ objet direct.

- Les pronoms complément d’ objet indirect.

WEEK 5: Le pronom- y

Le pronom – en

Exercices de la classe sur les Adverbes et les Pronoms

WEEK 6 LA VOIX ACTIVE ET LA VOIX INACTIVE.,

WEEK 7 1st CONTINUOUS ASSESMENT.

WEEK 8 LE STYLE DIRECT ET LE STYLE INDIRECT.

WEEK 7 1st CONTINUOUS ASSESMENT.

WEEK 9 : LA COMMUNICATION ECRITE.

- Découvertes inventions scientifiques : Travail a partir des textes sur les nouvelles

technologies ( téléphone portable , internet etc}

-. Des habitudes que je souhaite abandonner.

- . La polygamie est – elle toujours recommander en Afrique ?

WEEK 10 Les moyens de communication aujourd’hui .

- Ma première classe de français.

- Lorsque j’ étais enfant ce que je faisais .

WEEK 11 : EXERCICECS D’ ORAL EN CONTEXTE .

-. Faire des projets et prendre rendez-vous.

- Compréhension .

- Prononciation .

WEEK 11 CULTURE ET CIVILISATION FRANCAISE.

WEEK 12 EXAMINATION.

The following are resources materials for further reading

Required texts:

Anne Akyüz,Bernadette Bazelle Les exercices de Grammaire 2008 –

Paris.

Dominque Abry

Marie – Laure chalaron Phonétique 1994 Paris.

Joël Bonenfant, Marie Françoise Gliemann

Anne Akyüz,Bernadette Bazelle Niveau intermédiaire Grammaire

Progressive du Grammaire 2013- Paris.

Joël Bonenfant, Marie Françoise Gliemann

Jean Dubois, René Lagane Larousse Livre de Bord Grammaire 2012 Espagne.

Paulin Dipe Alo : Eléments de base en Phonétique et le Phonétisme du Français

1999 Lagos – Nigeria.

Online ressources materials Sur le plan de FLE.

Recommended tests:

S. Ade Ojo Practical French for Anglophones Learners 2012 Agbowo U.I

Ibadan.

S. Ade Ojo A Comprehensive Revision Handbook of French Grammar.

2000. Agbowo U.I Ibadan.

Tunde Ajiboye : Introduction to Practice in Oral French ( Revised edition Mapo ,

Ibadan.

Tunde Ajiboye : First Essay in French 2008 ,Ilorin Nigeria

Tunji Adesola : Techniques of French Composition 2000 Agbowo U.I. Ibadan.

Requirements

 Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

 To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a

minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

 A mid- semester evaluation as part of the Continuous

Assessment is mandatory

 Assignment must be submitted online

 An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is

required to be able to register for the succeeding semester

or access to examination results.

GRADING SYSTEM

Mid- Semester Evaluation 15%

Assignment 15%

Attendance 10%

Examination 60%

STUDENTS.

ALASHE ISIRAT ADESHOLA

MUSBAU FARID  K

OJEDOKUN  RAIMOT .O

KATAYE GANIYAT  O

ADEJUMO FATIMO ABIMBOLA

APAMPA GANIYAT O.

ORIOLOWO  ZAINAB ABISOLA

ODEGBENLE MARIAM

TAJUDEEN AMIDAT ANIKE

EYEBIOKIN  OLUMIDE  SEGUN

OGUNNOWO EMMANUEL O


This course is devoted to a care examination of the grammatical and lexical

features of adverbs. The aspects highlighted include how and when French

adverbs are used, their English meaning s and what value French adverbs add to

meaning words and sentences.

 COURSE OUTLINE.

WEEK 1: INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE

Adverbs are used in French ,as in English, to add more information to the

meanings of words belonging to such parts of speech as verbs , adjectives other

adverbs. As well as personal pronoun and present subjunctive.

WEEK 2 : LES ADVERBS.

- Adverbs of manner.

- Adverbs of manner formed with – ment

- Adjectives used with verbs to form Adverbs of Manner.

- Adverbs of Time

- Adverbs of Place

- Adverbs of Quantity

WEEK 3: LES PRONM PERSONNEL

- Les pronoms sujet et les pronoms tonique

- Les pronom complément d’ objet direct.

- Les pronoms complément d’ objet indirect.

WEEK 4 : Le pronom- y

Le pronom – en

Exercices de la classe sur les Adverbes et les Pronoms

WEEK 5 :LA VOIX ACTIVE ET LA VOIX INACTIVE.,

WEEK 6 LE STYLE DIRECT ET LE STYLE INDIRECT.

WEEK 7 1st CONTINUOUS ASSESMENT.

WEEK 8 : LA COMMUNICATION ECRITE.

- Découvertes inventions scientifiques : Travail a partir des textes sur les

nouvelles technologies ( téléphone portable , internet etc}

- . La polygamie est – elle toujours recommander en Afrique ?

WEEK 9 Les moyens de communication aujourd’hui .

- Ma première classe de français.

- Lorsque j’ étais enfant ce que je faisais .

WEEK 10 : EXERCICECS D’ ORAL EN CONTEXTE .

-. Faire des projets et prendre rendez-vous.

- Compréhension .

- Prononciation .

- RYTHME - Les syllabes accentuées (2)

RYTHME - La Langues familière (2)

-.. Intonation – S’ énerver, protester .

-. Demander son Chemin et décrire un lieu.

-. Compréhension .

-. Prononciation.

WEEK 11. CULTURE ET CIVILISATION. . La vie politique.

- Le pouvoir exécutif.

-- Le pouvoir législative

L’ Assemblée Nationale , Le Sénat.

- Le pouvoir judiciaire .

- Les partis politiques .

- Les Elections .

- Exercices.

- . Le mariage, la famille et le système de la protection sociale.

- Le mariage

- Pourquoi se marie –t- on ?

- Le divorce .

- La famille

- Attitudes et comportements des jeunes en famille.

- Le langage des jeunes.

- Les conditions sociales.

- La sécurité sociale

WEEK 12 EXAMINATION

The following are resources materials for further reading

Required texts:

Anne Akyüz,Bernadette Bazelle Les exercices de Grammaire 2008 –

Paris.

Dominque Abry

Marie – Laure chalaron Phonétique 1994 Paris.

Joël Bonenfant, Marie Françoise Gliemann

Anne Akyüz,Bernadette Bazelle Niveau intermédiaire Grammaire

Progressive du Grammaire 2013- Paris.

Joël Bonenfant, Marie Françoise Gliemann

Jean Dubois, René Lagane Larousse Livre de Bord Grammaire 2012 Espagne.

Paulin Dipe Alo : Eléments de base en Phonétique et le Phonétisme du Français

1999 Lagos – Nigeria.

Online ressources materials Sur le plan de FLE.

Recommended tests:

S. Ade Ojo Practical French for Anglophones Learners 2012 Agbowo U.I

Ibadan.

S. Ade Ojo A Comprehensive Revision Handbook of French Grammar.

2000. Agbowo U.I Ibadan.

Simeon Olayiwola Initiatin a la Culture et Civilisation 2005 Agbowo U,I

Ibadan.

Tunde Ajiboye : Introduction to Practice in Oral French ( Revised edition Mapo ,

Ibadan.

Tunde Ajiboye : First Essay in French 2008 ,Ilorin Nigeria

Tunji Adesola : Techniques of French Composition 2000 Agbowo U.I. Ibadan.

Requirements

 Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

 To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a

minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

 A mid- semester evaluation as part of the Continuous

Assessment is mandatory

 Assignment must be submitted online

 An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is

required to be able to register for the succeeding semester

or access to examination results.

GRADING SYSTEM

Mid- Semester Evaluation 15%

Assignment 15%

Attendance 10%

Examination 60%

STUDENTS.

ABIODUN  KAYODE MUSLIUDEEN

MIKAIL  NIMOT  ETIM ASUQUO

ATIKU  SADIAT  YETUNDE

ADESANYA  ADEWUMI

AJANI  TOYOSI  MARIAM

OMORO BECKY RUKAYAT

SCENT-WEST  UMMUL  SALMON

ABDUL SALAM  ABDULQUDUS

OJO  OLAMIDE  HELEN

EYEBIOKIN OLUMIDE  SEGUN

OGUNNOWO EMMANUEL O


The course is devoted to the understanding of how to know the French adjectives

type of adjective feminine and plurals . A study of French phonetics including the

use of the international phonetics Alphabet for transcription, phonetic theory and

corrective phonetics .


WEEK1: INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE

The course involves the study of basic element of French adjective, the type of

adjectives and the characteristics of adjective. Not only that, attention also should

pay to feminine and plural of masculine adjectives as well as possessive adjectives

and demonstrative adjective. Comprehension,Composition, Culture and

civilization.

WEEK 2: DEFINITION OF ADJECTIVE AND TYPES

Focuses will be on the definition of adjective types of adjective special features of

adjective. At the end of the course students should be able to acquire general

knowledge of French adjectives and ability to pronounce correctly.

WEEK 3: Adjective used after nouns.

Adjectives which precede nouns (pronoun position

Adjective whose meanings are affected by their position

WEEK 4: Class work on adjectives.

WEEK 5: feminine adjectives and masculine plural adjectives.

Exercises on feminine adjectives

WEEK 6: Class work on plural adjectives

WEEK 7:

1st Continuous Assessment.

WEEK 8: What are possessive adjectives

Exercises on possessive adjective

WEEK 9: POSSESSIVE PRONOUN.

WEEK 10: DEMONSTRATION ADJECTIVES

WEEK 11: THE DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUN..

WEEK 12: EXAMINATION

The following are resources materials for further reading

Required texts:

Andrey Martineno.

Sylvie Poisson Méthode de Français Initial 1 1999 Saint Germain – du

– puy.

Anne Akyüz,Bernadette Bazelle Les exercices de Grammaire 2008 –

Paris.

Joël Bonenfant, Marie Françoise Gliemann

Anne Akyüz,Bernadette Bazelle Niveau intermédiaire Grammaire

Progressive du Grammaire 2013- Paris

Joël Bonenfant, Marie Françoise Gliemann

Jean Dubois, René Lagane Larousse Livre de Bord Grammaire 2012 Espagne.

Online resources materials. Sur le plan de FLE.

Recommended tests

Besherelle L’art de Conjuguer 12,000 verbes 1994 Italie.

:

S. Ade Ojo Practical French for Anglophones Learners 2012 Agbowo U.I

Ibadan.

S. Ade Ojo A Comprehensive Revision Handbook of French Grammar.

2000. Agbowo U.I Ibadan.

Simeon Olayiwola Initiation à la Culture et Civilisation 2005 Agbowo ,U.I.

Ibadan.

Tunde Ajiboye : Introduction to Practice in Oral French ( Revised edition Mapo ,

Ibadan.

Tunde Ajiboye : First Essay in French 2008 ,Ilorin Nigeria

Requirements

 Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

 To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a

minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

 A mid- semester evaluation as part of the Continuous

Assessment is mandatory

 Assignment must be submitted online

 An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is

required to be able to register for the succeeding semester

or access to examination results.

GRADING SYSTEM

Mid- Semester Evaluation 15%

Assignment 15%

Attendance 10%

Examination 60%

TEACHER  OROKOLA ISIAKA

ADEBISI  RODIAT ABIDEMI

ISHOLA BALQIS IRORUNOLA

OLADEJO HIQMAT OYINKANSOLA

MARYAM  UMAR MOHAMMED

MUIBI BALIKIS OLANIKE

SALAMI HADIZAT OPEYEMI

THANNI AISHA ARINOLA

ADEBAYO MARIAM ATINUKE

ARO    MAYOWA

TAJUDEEN BOLAJI TESLEEM

AKINBOLA  ANNIS  MUHAMMED

OGUN  AKINOLA SAMUEL

AMACHREE  S. ENDURANCE

BENIGN JOY OYIZO

LAWAL FOLAYEM I KAFAYAT

YABIFA TOKONI  IBIFA’A

PENNUEL SULAIMAN  SOPRIALA

ADEWUMI  SARAFADEEN ABIODUN


The course is carefully package with logically developed explanation to intimate

the learner with the French article : its different forms its relationship with the

French nouns and some other parts of speech .

FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY, OSOGBO

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

GENERAL STUDIES UNIT

 

Academic Year 2019/2020                          Second Semester

Course Title: Beginner’s Arabic                  Course Code: GNS 106       1 unit

Lecturer: Mr. Badmus Issa Abdulwaheed

 E-mail: badmus.issaabdulwaheed@gmail.com                 Telephone: 08030789545

CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course gives introduction to the facts about Arabic language and the rudiments on how to communicate with Arabic language with the necessary knowledge to communicate domestically and also expose the students to some Arabic diction to aid the student’s conversation in Arabic language. It is also designed to acquaint the students with needed tools in domestic Arabic conversation.

WEEK I: INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE.

i.        Introduction to Arabic 

ii.      Fact and myths about Arabic.

iii.    Loanwords in English from Arabic

WEEK II: ARABIC VOCABULARY

i.       General travel vocabulary

ii.      Sports and sports vocabulary in Arabic

iii.     Political Arabic terms

WEEK III:  ARABIC PARTICLES

i.      Arabic interrogative particles

ii.    Cardinal directions in Arabic -  اتجاهات البوصلة

iii.     Arabic negation – how to say NO in Arabic

iv.       The words and opposites 

WEEK IV: DAYS OF THE WEEK

i.        Days of the week (أيَّامُ الْأُسْبُوعِ  ayyaamul-usbuuc)

ii.       Days of the week in Arabic in past tense:

iii.     Days of the week in Arabic in future tense

WEEK V: BODY PARTS IN ARABIC

i.       Arabic complete guide of body parts

ii.      Human hand and leg parts in Arabic

iii.     Human trunk parts in Arabic

WEEK VI: GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES IN ARABIC

i.     Names of some notable towns

ii.    Names of some notable countries

iii.    Names of some notable continents

WEEK VII: MID-SEMESTER ASSESSMENT

Students will be examined in the areas that have so far been covered in the Semester. This will afford students an opportunity of a revision of all topics that have already been taken.

WEEK VIII: SCHOOL

i.      School tools

WEEK IX: FAMILY

i.      Members of the family

WEEK X: FEMINISM IN ARABIC LANGUAGE

i.      Signs of feminism

WEEK XI: ARABIC PHRASES

i.  Basic Arabic phrases

WEEK XII: ARABIC GREETINGS

i.      Greetings in Arabic

ii.     Wishes in Arabic

iii.    Directions in Arabic

The following are resource materials for further reading

REQUIRED TEXTS

·  Imran H. A. (Dr.) “Gateway to Arabic” Book one. A foundation course in reading and writing Arabic.  Starter book.

·   Prepared GNS 106 Handbook

REQUIREMENTS

·         Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

·         To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

·         A mid-semester evaluation as part of the Continuous Assessment is mandatory

·         Assignments must be submitted and deadline must be met.

·         An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is required to be able to register for the succeeding semester or access to examination results.

GRADING SYSTEM

Mid-Semester Evaluation        15%

Assignment                             15%

Attendance                             10%

Examination                            60%

 

 

FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY, OSOGBO

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

GENERAL STUDIES UNIT

 

Academic Year 2019/2020                                      Second Semester

Course Title: Fountain University Arabic       Course Code: FUA 102      0 unit

Lecturer: Mr. Badmus Issa Abdulwaheed

 E-mail: badmus.issaabdulwaheed@gmail.com                                              Telephone: 08030789545

CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to expose the students to the elementary aspects of Arabic studies and to acquaint the students with the historic importance of Arabic language and to introduce the art of identification, pronunciation and writing to the students through all its formats. A critical attention is also given to Arabic vowels in its variant forms (long/short/double). It also teaches how to join letters together to form sounding syllables.

WEEK I: GENERAL PREAMBLE ABOUT FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY ARABIC

      Arabic’s historical importance

      What is Arabic?

      Who are Arabs?

      Arabic and Arabs connection with Islam

      Arabic origin words in English and Yoruba languages

WEEK II: ARABIC ALPHABETS

i.      Discovering the Arabic alphabet

ii.      Dotted letters

iii.    Undotted letters                                 

WEEK III: ARABIC VOWELS (SHORT)

 Fatha

Kasrah

Dummah

Sukuun

WEEK IV: ARABIC VOWELS (LONG)

Madd with A sound  (آ)

Madd with I  sound (إِي)

Madd with U sound  (أُو) 

WEEK V: ARABIC VOWELS (DOUBLE) TANWEEN

Fathatan Nunation with an sound (ً)

Kasratan Nunation with in sound (ٍ)

Dammatan Nunation with un sound (ٌ)

WEEK VI: JOINING UP ARABIC LETTERS

Initial (beginning)

Middle

Final (end)

Joinable & non-joinable letters

WEEK VII: MID-SEMESTER ASSESSMENT

Students will be examined in the areas that have so far been covered in the Semester. This will afford students an opportunity of a revision of all topics that have already been taken. 

WEEK VIII: Pronunciation & writing practice of some Arabic verbs

WEEK IX: DIPHTHONGS

WEEK X: DOUBLE LETTERS

Doubling (tashdeed) of the Arabic letter

Arabic alphabets used in words

WEEK XI: DEFINITE AND INDEFINITE ARTICLES IN ARABIC

The rule

The inevitable exceptions

WEEK XII: THE DEFINITE ال   

The  moon letters "qamariyyah"

The sun letters "shamsiyyah"

The following are resource materials for further reading

REQUIRED TEXTS

·     Imran H. A. (Dr.) “Gateway to Arabic” Book one. A foundation course in reading and writing Arabic.  Starter book.

·     Prepared GNS 106 Handbook

REQUIREMENTS

·         Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

·         To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

·         A mid-semester evaluation as part of the Continuous Assessment is mandatory

·         Assignments must be submitted and deadline must be met.

·         An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is required to be able to register for the succeeding semester or access to examination results.

GRADING SYSTEM

Mid-Semester Evaluation      15%

Assignment                             15%

Attendance                             10%

Examination                            60%

FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY, OSOGBO

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

GENERAL STUDIES UNIT

Academic Year 2019/2020                                                  Second Semester

Course Title: Fountain University Fiqh        Course Code: FUC 402        0 unit

Coordinator: Mr. Badmus Issa Abdulwaheed

 E-mail: badmus.issaabdulwaheed@gmail.com                                                Telephone: 08030789545

CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is designed in conformity with the mission and vision of this great University. It inculcates the elementary foundations and rudiments of Islamic religion in students ranging from belief system (theology), Qur’anic reflection, morality, Shari’ah intelligence that treats misconceptions about Islam and Islamic jurisprudence. It equips the students with necessary and needed knowledge that will make the students dutiful to Allah and responsible kindly to the humanity. 

WEEK 1

Qadar

Qur’an chapters 64:11

WEEK 2

Tribulations and Qur’an

Qur’an chapters and verses: 2:155-157, 63:11, 57:22, 29:1-3, 2:214.

WEEK 3

The power of resurrection

Qur’an chapters:  2:258-260, 99:1-8

THEME: SHARIA INTELLIGENCE

WEEK 4

To what level of political status can a Muslim woman attain? Can she become a head of state or a judge?

Is there need for a barrier in the mosque?

WEEK 5 

Pre-marital counselling course

Consequences of divorce and poor marriage quality

Importance of marriage

WEEK 6

Is masturbation allowed in Islam?

WEEK 7

 The concept of debt and loan-taking in Islam

WEEK 8

Funeral engagements in Islam (1)

Preparation

Bathing etiquettes

Clothing etiquettes

WEEK 9

Funeral engagements in Islam (2)

Praying and prayers

The abode (grave)

Post funeral activities

WEEK 10

The principle of child custody in Islam

WEEK 11

Islamic law of estate sharing

WEEK 12

Offences and punishment in Islam

Adultery and fornication

Stealing

Drinking alcoholic

The following are resource materials for further reading

REQUIRED TEXTS

·  Holy Qur’an

·   Prepared FUC 402 Handbook

REQUIREMENTS

·         It is compulsory course for both Muslims and Christians

·         Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

·         To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

·         An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is required to be able to register for the succeeding semester or access to examination results.

GRADING SYSTEM

Attendance                             40%

Examination                            60 %

 


FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY, OSOGBO

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

GENERAL STUDIES UNIT

Academic Year 2019/2020                             Second Semester

Course Title: Fountain University Fiqh     Course Code: FUC 302            0 unit

Coordinator: Mr. Badmus Issa Abdulwaheed

 E-mail: badmus.issaabdulwaheed@gmail.com       

Telephone: 08030789545

CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is designed in conformity with the mission and vision of this great University. It inculcates the elementary foundations and rudiments of Islamic religion in students ranging from belief system (theology), Qur’anic reflection, morality, Shari’ah intelligence that treats misconceptions about Islam and Islamic jurisprudence. It equips the students with necessary and needed knowledge that will make the students dutiful to Allah and responsible kindly to the humanity. 

WEEK 1

 Biology in Qur’an

Qur’an chapters: 11:7, 21:30, 24:45, 25:54

WEEK 2

Allah’s attributes: ability to do all things

Qur’an chapters: 2:106, 2:117, 3:165, 3:189, 9:116, 11:4, 16:40, 40:68, 41:39,  42:49, 57:2

WEEK 3

Maryam and Jesus in the light of Qur’an

Qur’an chapters: 19: 16 - 35

THEME: SHARIA INTELLIGENCE

WEEK 4

What is the Islamic concept of the Holy Spirit?

WEEK 5

Jesus as “a word” from God in the Qur’an

WEEK 6

Islam claims to object to Tyranny, Leadership by virtue of inheritance (Monarchy) and Theocracy by a group of religiously ordained clergy, etc. Does Islam object to Western democracy?

WEEK 7

Who is an ideal and responsible Muslim/Muslimah

WEEK 8

       Concept of Al-Ihsan (goodness) in Islam

WEEK 9

Justice in Islam

WEEK 10

Islam and homosexuality

Definition 

Gay and lesbianism and practices

Punishments

Medical implications

WEEK 11

Marriage in Islam

Definition

Etiquettes of marriage and its conditions

Pillars of marriage

WEEK 12

Compatibility in marriage

Forbidden marriages in Islam

The following are resource materials for further reading

REQUIRED TEXTS

·  Holy Qur’an

·   Prepared FUC 302 Handbook

REQUIREMENTS

·         It is compulsory course for both Muslims and Christians

·         Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

·         To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

·         An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is required to be able to register for the succeeding semester or access to examination results.

GRADING SYSTEM

Attendance                             40%

Examination                            60 %



FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY, OSOGBO

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

GENERAL STUDIES UNIT

Academic Year 2019/2020                                                    Second Semester

Course Title: Fountain University Fiqh                             Course Code: FUC 202            0 unit

Coordinator: Mr. Badmus Issa Abdulwaheed

 E-mail: badmus.issaabdulwaheed@gmail.com                 Telephone: 08030789545

CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is designed in conformity with the mission and vision of this great University. It inculcates the elementary foundations and rudiments of Islamic religion in students ranging from belief system (theology), Qur’anic reflection, morality, Shari’ah intelligence that treats misconceptions about Islam and Islamic jurisprudence. It equips the students with necessary and needed knowledge that will make the students dutiful to Allah and responsible kindly to the humanity. 

CONTACT SCHEDULE:

WEEK 1

A brief trip to hell fire

Qur’an chapters verses: 39:71-72, 45:34-35 40:48-50 4:56

WEEK 2

Punishment and reward in the hereafter

Qur’an chapters: 41: 46, 45:14, 78:17-40

WEEK 3

Shaytan and his plots

Qur’an chapters: 35:6, 2:168, 59:16, 41:36

THEME: SHARIA INTELLIGENCE

WEEK 4

1.      Is Pilgrimage (Hajj) not a pre-Islamic (Jahiliyyah) practice carried over into Islam so as to appease pagans in Makkah?

2.      Is it the Devil that Muslims stone during Hajj (pilgrimage)? And is that really where Satan is?                                                                                                                      

WEEK 5  

 Courtship in Islam

Why should women’s inheritance be half that of men?

WEEK 6                                                                                                

“Half-Witness for Women: Does it imply low intelligence?”

THEME: MORALITY (AKHLAQ) TOPICS

WEEK 7       

The concept of trust in Islam

WEEK 8 

 Etiquettes of visitation in Islam

WEEK 9

Who is an ideal and responsible Muslim/Muslimah?

WEEK 10

Purification in Islam

Definition

Types

WEEK 11

Ritual bath (Al-ghusl) in Islam

Definition

Kinds of the bath

WEEK 12

 Types of the bath

 Obligatory ritual bath

 Voluntary ritual bath

The following are resource materials for further reading

REQUIRED TEXTS

·  Holy Qur’an

·   Prepared FUC 102 Handbook

REQUIREMENTS

·         It is compulsory course for both Muslims and Christians

·         Attendance is compulsory for all registrants for the Course

·         To be qualified to write the examination for the course, a minimum of 70% attendance must be obtained by a student

·         An end of semester evaluation (online) by every student is required to be able to register for the succeeding semester or access to examination results.

GRADING SYSTEM

Attendance                             40%

Examination                            60 %

 

 


FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY, OSOGBO

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

GENERAL STUDIES UNIT

 

Academic Year 2019/2020                                                    Second Semester

Course Title: Fountain University Fiqh                             Course Code: FUC 102            0 unit

Coordinator: Mr. Badmus Issa Abdulwaheed

 E-mail: badmus.issaabdulwaheed@gmail.com                 Telephone: 08030789545

CONTENT/DESCRIPTION

This course is designed in conformity with the mission and vision of this great University. It inculcates the elementary foundations and rudiments of Islamic religion in students ranging from belief system (theology), Qur’anic reflection, morality, Shari’ah intelligence that treats misconceptions about Islam and Islamic jurisprudence. It equips the students with necessary and needed knowledge that will make the students dutiful to Allah and responsible kindly to the humanity. 

THEME: QURANIC REFLECTIONS

WEEK 1

Creation of human beings from water

Qur’an chapters: 40:67, 77:20, 21:30, 24:45, 25:54

WEEK 2

 Allah has neither wife nor son

Qur’an chapters: 72:3, 112:3

WEEK 3

Allah deserves to be obeyed

Qur’an chapters: 4:69, 4:125

THEME: SHARIA INTELLIGENCE

WEEK 4

Misconceptions about Islam

Is there a compulsory age prescribed by Islam for a woman to get married?

Are women allowed to come into the mosque?

Why do women stay behind men in prayer (salat)? Does this not indicate that women are spiritually behind men in Islam?

WEEK 5

Is Islam not too restrictive, conservative and anti-social in view of the fact that it prohibits drinking, mixed dancing and extramarital sexual relations?

WEEK 6

  What are the objectives of Shari’ah?

WEEK 7       

  Etiquettes of sleeping

WEEK 8

Etiquettes of companionship and friendship in Islam

WEEK 9

Who is an ideal and responsible Muslim/Muslimah?

WEEK 10

The concept of Ablution in Islam

Definition

Obligatory aspects of Ablution

Sunnah aspects of ablution

Vitiation of ablution

WEEK 11

The concept of Tayamam in Islam

Why perform Tayamam

How is it performed?

Vitiation of Tayamam

WEEK 12

How Prophet Muhammad (SAW) performed Salat (prayer) and what vitiates Salat.

The following are resource materials for further reading

REQUIRED TEXTS

·  Holy Qur’an

·   Prepared FUC 102 Handbook

REQUIREMENTS

· &